Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


World’s Best Pianists Start Arriving into NZ

WORLD’S BEST PIANISTS START ARRIVING INTO NZ

KERIKERI INTERNATIONAL

PIANO COMPETITION

3-6 July 2014

TICKETS ON SALE

@ The Centre, Kerikeri

Musicians from throughout the world have started arriving into New Zealand to contest the prestigious Kerikeri International Piano Competition to be staged over four days starting next Thursday, July 3.

Pianists from the USA, Australia, Malaysia, China, the UK, Austria, Switzerland and New Zealand will descend on the Far North town for New Zealand’s oldest and most prestigious piano competition, vying for a slice of the $30,000 in prizemoney.

The winner will receive $15,000 while second will receive $6000 and third $3000. There are additional prizes of $2000 for the Best Sonata Performance, and $1000 each for the Encouragement and People’s Choice awards.

Kerikeri is transforming into a musician’s mecca for the event and the town is buzzing with expectation of an influx of visitors.

“The piano is ‘humming’ and the concert piano is ready to face the onslaught from 14 pianists, 28 hands and 140 fingers,” enthuses event co-ordinator John Jackets.

Mr Jackets says the competition has gained momentum among musicians throughout the world, with a record 54 pianists vying for a spot in the competition that’s only open to the top 16 (as determined by an independent and anonymous judge).

The 2014 competition will take another step forward with the introduction of a three-judge panel of adjudicators. The panel will comprise pianists with an international reputation and competition experience drawn from around the world.

• Natasha Vlassenko: Head of keyboard at Queensland Conservatorium, Griffith University, Brisbane

• Christopher Elton: Emeritus Professor, Royal Academy of Music, London

• Terence Dennis: William Evans Professor, University of Otago, Dunedin (currently on tour with Dame Kiri Te Kanawa)

The four day event begins with an opening recital by one of the judges, followed by three rounds of competition. Round 1- a classical sonata and Round 2 a 35 minute recital. Four pianists are selected for the Final one hour recital round.

Mr Jackets says music enthusiasts have been bowled over by the standard of competition performance and now travel from far and wide to attend.

He likens the competition to the “Olympics” of the piano! The preparation, both mental and physical, is extremely demanding. All music must be performed from memory, a feat in itself.

Tickets are still available from the Turner Centre Box Office.

More details can be obtained at www.kipc.org.nz

Musicians chosen to contest the 2014 title are:

Sabina Im

Is currently studying for a masters in Piano Performance at The Royal College of Music, London.

She was recently selected to take part in London Master classes with full scholarship provided by the Tait Memorial Trust.

Alex Raineri

Australian Alex Raineiri recently completed his Bachelor of Music (Advanced Performance) with First Class Honours and a University Medal from the Queensland Conservatorium. He has been a national finalist in the ABC Symphony Australia Young Performer Award three times. He was the People’s Choice prize winner at KIPC 2010

Ayesha Gough

Born in Australia in 1994, Ayesha is currently studying for a Bachelor of Music at the Queensland Conservatorium. She has received awards for best performance of an Australian work, and People’s Choice Awards as well as participating at the Tyalgum Festival of Classical Music. She has been supported throughout by Variety, The Children’s Charity.

Bradley Wood

From Christchurch, twenty year old Bradley Wood is currently a third year student at the University of Auckland working towards a bachelor of Music degree, majoring in performance piano with Rae de Lisle. He is the Auckland Philharmonia’s Piano Scholar for 2014.

Cole Anderson

A graduate of the Oberlin Conservatorium Ohio, Cole completed a Master’s degree in Piano Performance and Chamber Music performance at the University of Michigan and is currently completing a doctorate there.

Daniel Le

Currently a second year piano student at Yong Siew Toh Conservatorium of Music, Singapore, Daniel started his musical journey when he was accepted at the age of thirteen into the Australian National Academy of Music Young Academy programme.

David Soo

Twenty-one year old David Soo has won many competition prizes in France and Malaysia and was awarded first prize in Australia’s most prestigious piano competition, the Melbourne Recital Centre

Great Romantics Competition. He recently gave a sold out solo debut recital at the same Centre and was awarded a scholarship in 2009 to study in Paris.

Jane Nayoung Koo

Jane Nayoung is studying Master of Music in piano performance at the University of Auckland with Qu Yong. In 2012 she was the winner of the University’s Graduation Gala Concerto Competition and last year, 2013, was awarded fourth prize in the Wallace National Piano Competition and Best Performance of Mozart prize at the Lev Vlassenko Piano Competition. This is her third KIPC.

King Yi Foong

Nineteen year old King Yi Foong is the recipient of three full music scholarships from the Victorian College of the Arts Secondary school and R.E.A.L International School.

At only sixteen she was awarded Distinction in the Trinity Guildhall Fellow Diploma Piano Recital. She is currently studying at the Melbourne Conservatorium of Music with Glenn Riddle.

Lucy Zeng

Lucy is currently studying piano performance at Masters level at Auckland University’s School of Music with Rae de Lisle. She was awarded Third prize and the Sonata prize at the Kerikerki International Piano Competition in 2010. This is her third KIPC. In 2013 Lucy won the Dame Malvina Foundation Alice Cole piano scholarship and University of Auckland Reardon Postgraduate Music Scholarship.

Siyuan Li

Siyuan, 26, was born in Guangzhou, China and now lives in the United States. She began her piano studies at an early age and has gone from strength to strength gaining a Master’s degree in performance having studied with Arthur Greene at Michigan University. She joined the piano faculty in Anchorage in 2013 and is presently completing her Doctoral degree of Musical Art in piano performance at University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre and Dance with Arthur Greene.

Sylvia Jiang

Sylvia now 18, gained a diploma at age fifteen and has won many solo concerto and chamber music competitions. She was awarded second place in the New Zealand Wallace National Piano Competition and won the Lewis Eady 2013 Emerging Artist Series.

She successfully gained scholarships to four Schools of Music and will begin studies at the Juilliard School this August. Sylvia is the youngest contestant in KIPC 2014.

Vivian Cheng

Chinese-American pianist Vivian Cheng, 24, gave her debut solo recital at the age of ten and has since performed throughout her native country of the United States, and in Austria, France, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands and Switzerland. She studied at The Juilliard School where, at 15 she became one of the youngest students in their history to be accepted. She is currently pursuing a Master of Music degree in Saltzburg.

Xuan He

25 year old, Xuan He was born in China and now lives in the United States where he is currently pursuing his Master of Music degree at North Western University under full scholarship.

He has performed in venues across three continents , won many competitions and prizes and performed in master classes with Boris Berman, Robert Levin and Murray Perahia to name but a few.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Obituary: Andrew Little Remembers Murray Ball

“Murray mined a rich vein of New Zealand popular culture and exported it to the world. Wal and Dog and all the other Kiwi characters he crafted through Footrot Flats were hugely popular here and in Australia, Europe and North America." More>>

ALSO:

Organised Choas: NZ Fringe Festival 2017 Awards

Three more weeks of organised chaos have come to an end with the Wellington NZ Fringe Arts Festival Awards Ceremony as a chance to celebrate all our Fringe artists for their talent, ingenuity, and chutzpah! More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Wellington Writer Wins $US165,000 Literature Prize

Victoria University of Wellington staff member and alumna Ashleigh Young has won a prestigious Windham-Campbell Literature Prize worth USD$165,000 for her book of essays Can You Tolerate This? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: We’re All Lab Rats

A couple of years ago, there were reports that Silicon Valley executives were sending their children to tech-free schools. It was a story that dripped of irony: geeks in the heart of techno-utopia rejecting their ideology when it came to their own kids. But the story didn’t catch on, and an awkward question lingered. Why were the engineers of the future desperate to part their gadgets from their children? More>>

  • CensusAtSchool - Most kids have no screen-time limits
  • Netsafe - Half of NZ high school students unsupervised online
  • Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Culture
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news