Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Nelson teens stage trailblazing musical

Nelson teens stage trailblazing musical

A musical about depression may sound like a weird mix, but it won a Pulitzer and three ‘Tony’ awards on Broadway in 2010 and now a Nelson drama school is bringing the show to the Suter Theatre.

Actor and drama teacher Tami Mansfield who runs the Off Broadway Performing Arts School is directing Next to Normal at the Suter on Jul 4-6. She says staging the show was her students’ idea.

They came to me and said ‘this is the musical we want to perform’,” she says. “They see it as important to share, especially in our culture – they want to show that with mental health issues people can get better. Other messages of the show are that no one is alone, we all have problems, it’s okay to talk about it - the cost of pretending is too high.”

Mansfield says she’s really impressed at the commitment and talent of her students and thrilled to have financial support from Nelson Mental Health Services with the cost of hiring the theatre. However, she says ticket sales are still to take off.

“This is a great show, it does have heavy themes, but it’s funny and the music is great,” she says. “These kids are so talented it will be an amazing show…everyone is putting so much work into it, we really don’t want people to miss it because we don’t have money to advertise. Nelson has been very good to us since we moved here so I’m optimistic that people will come along and help us to make this show happen.”

Next to Normal is about a couple who lose one of their children and can't cope. 16 years later, daughter Natalie takes a self-destructive path due to her parents’ neglect. She meets 16-year-old Henry, a ‘bit of a stoner’ who shows her love for the first time. Diana, her mother, has manic depression and their lives are consumed with pills, doctors, and hospital visits; while Dan, the father, ‘protects’ them from the conversations that actually need to happen. The result is shocking with some surprising and haunting twists.

Eighteen year old Natalie Davies plays Diana, a 43 year old mother and wife suffering from manic depression. She says the fact that something like this is being brought forward by kids, is extremely powerful, and shows something for our generation.

“We brought this show to Tami because we wanted to deliver the message that it is okay to talk about things that are hurting you, and that you don't have to ‘drink a glass of concrete and harden up’,” she says. “We are saying that sweeping feelings under the rug doesn't have the desired effect, and can hurt others as much as it can hurt you.”

Next to Normal pulls at all the feelings, with a heartbreakingly beautiful score and a brilliant and surprising story’ - Frank Rick, New York Times.

Next to Normal will be staged by Off Broadway, directed by Tami Mansfield at The Suter Theatre at 7pm Fri, Sat, and Sundayplus a 2pm matinee on Saturday. PG 13 is advised. Tickets at Everyman and at the door.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Law Society: Sir Peter Williams QC, 1934 - 2015

“Sir Peter was an exceptional advocate. He had the ability to put the defence case for his clients with powerful oratory. His passion shone through in everything he did and said.” Mr Moore says Sir Peter’s lifelong commitment to prison reform was instrumental in ensuring prison conditions and the rights of prisoners were brought to public attention. More>>

ALSO:

CTU: Peter Conway – Family Statement

Peter committed his whole working life to improving the lives of working people, both in unions and, more recently, as the Economist and Secretary of the Council of Trade Unions. He was previously Chair of Oxfam New Zealand and was on the Board of NZ Trade and Enterprise. More>>

ALSO:

Hundertwasser Art Museum: Whangarei Says Yes

Provisional results confirm Whangarei voted Option B in a landslide result for the Hundertwasser and Wairau Maori Art Centre project. 13,726 voted for the Hundertwasser project in a FPP binding referendum that had higher voter turnout than the last local body election. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news