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Real Stories From The Heart Of A Disaster

Real Stories From The Heart Of A Disaster

‘MUNTED’ - powerful storytelling, verbatim theatre – 10 - 31Aug

The Christchurch earthquake brought an obscure word into common usage – ‘Munted’, meaning wrecked, damaged or ruined.

That’s also the title of a theatrical response to the Canterbury 22 February 2011 earthquake, derived exclusively from interviews with those who experienced it, including Cantabrians, members of the media and other New Zealanders. Three performers bring 15 people to vivid life in this hour long show: From a dentist buried in a hole filled with liquefaction, to a TV cameraman stuck on the roof of his building, to a school teacher and a four year old boy – these are shared stories of hope and loss, finding laughter amongst grief, and a strengthened community in the heart of a shaken city.

Simple storytelling, no costume changes, honest perspectives – this is verbatim documentary theatre at its best. Following a four week season at the Stella Adler Theatre, Los Angeles in July, Munted tours nationally with Arts On Tour NZ in August. See itinerary below.

“A subtle blend of humour, emotional reflection and eye-witness testimony of the Christchurch February earthquake, MUNTED is a powerful example of how well verbatim theatre can work….We are moved by the simple embodiment of the actors showing us the experiences – bemusement, exhilaration, trauma, loss - of those that were there.” Michael Wray, Wellington.

“Powerful and humane, yet often humorous.”

John Smythe, Theatreview

“… a beautifully crafted piece of documentary theatre...It takes absolute skill and professionalism to put together a show like this…” Arrun Soma, journalist.

ends

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