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Political Films at the 2014 NZ International Film Festival

Political Films at the 2014 NZ International Film Festival

The New Zealand International Film Festival (NZIFF) has now launched its programme of films screening during July and August and we’re very excited to announce the highlights of our political section.

Covering off issues both in New Zealand and the world at large, the 2014 program tackles everything from climate change in New Zealand (Hot Air) and corporate responsibility in the aftermath of environmental damage in the Pacific (Cap Bocage) to the power of the political demonstration (Demonstration), an analysis of Israeli political policy by some of the world’s leading minds (notes to eternity); an unflinching look at the military police and their attempt to shape a revolution (Maïdan), as well as a profile of the man who coined the phrase ‘genocide’ and the impact he had on four modern day activists (Watchers of the Sky). A particularly powerful and uniquely New Zealand film is Tūmanako/Hope – a documentary that examines several generations of inhabitants of the Hokianga asking them why and how they came to live there, and what they see as New Zealand’s greatest challenges. Their answers may well surprise you as much as the varied backgrounds of the people documented.

Education is another big issue and At Berkeley is perfectly timed as New Zealand ponders the great Charter Schools debate and concern over tertiary funding swells. One of the last public universities in the USA, Berkeley has continuously faced declining funding and enforced cutbacks over the last few decades. This documentary looks at the actions taken by administration and students in response to the cutbacks, how it effects the education provided and received, and ultimately how capitalism can reshape a country’s educational outlook in a time when dwindling resources are of primary concern.

Also attached are details of films that can only be classed as examining Worker’s Rights including the Palme d’Or nominated drama Two Days, One Night which just won Best Film at the Sydney Film Festival. The tale of a woman told on a Friday that she’s being made redundant on Monday after her co worker’s voted to receive an annual bonus instead of allowing her to keep her job; she has until Sunday evening to convince them to change their minds. Starring the luminous Marion Cotillard, tickets are already selling fast.

Staying with the theme of Worker’s Rights, Concerning Violence looks at the struggle for African independence during the 1960s and 1970s, largely through a quest for financial stability. The Liberian miner’s strike is just one of nine examples outlined in this documentary by the maker ofThe Black Power Mixtape.

As always, group bookings with discounts for orders of more than 20 are available, and they make wonderful fundraisers or general education evenings.

2014_NZIFF_Politics.pdf
2014_NZIFF_Education.pdf
2014_NZIFF_Workers_Rights_on_Film.pdf
Group_Bookings_info_Wgtn__NZ.docx

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