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Taki Rua presents Magical Tale of The Sea


Taki Rua presents Magical Tale of The Sea



The story of the children of Tangaroa (atua of the sea) features in a new play touring to marae around Aotearoa as part of Taki Rua Productions' Te Reo Māori Season.

Written by Auckland playwright Noa Campbell (Te Rarawa/Ngapuhi), Ngunguru I Te Ao I Te Po opens at Manurewa Marae on Monday 21 July to mark the start of Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori (Maori Language Week) before touring to other marae in Auckland, Hamilton, Napier, Wellington, and Invercargill.

This year marks the 19th year Taki Rua has presented a children’s play in te reo for its Te Reo Māori Season.

In Noa Campbell’s play tamariki travel on an adventure into the oceanic depths, rocky shorelines and pristine beaches of Aotearoa.


Here in the heart of Te Moananui a Kiwa, they meet five ocean creatures, following them as they reveal the beauty of their watery home and on as they battle an oily and terrifying slick.

The performance uses high-energy physical theatre, waiata and dance to create a work that celebrates all things Te Ao Māori and is designed as a fun, exciting and accessible te reo Māori theatre experience, suitable for a wide range of ages and language proficiency levels.

Ngunguru I Te Ao I Te Po is directed by Maria Walker and features dancer Te Arahi Easton and brother and sister actors Nepia and Kamaia Takuira-Mita.

Director Maria Walker says environmental issues are at the core of the work, but the message is being told through simple storytelling.

“It would be nice if tamariki had a sense that kai moana might not necessarily always be around and that it’s vital, especially as a food source for us and for the wildlife, that it’s honoured, respected and thought about.”

Maria says the cast members come from different backgrounds – from dance, performance and kapa haka – and those unique styles are combined in the show.

She hopes tamariki engage with the magic of the experience of theatre. “I remember being that kid who sees a show at school and felt in awe of the whole thing – it was magical. I want to capture children’s imaginations for a little bit so they can have that same experience.”

Ngunguru I Te Ao I Te Po tours New Zealand maraes from Monday 21 July to Saturday 13 September. Entry is by koha (donation). For information visit www.takirua.co.nz

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