Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search


World premiere of Voices of the Land in Wellington

World premiere of Voices of the Land – Richard Nunns documentary – in Wellington

A cinematic documentary about Richard Nunns, a world-renowned performer of taonga pūoro, traditional Māori instruments, will premiere at Wellington’s New Zealand International Film Festival this month.

Nga Reo O Te Whenua – Voices of the Land’, directed by award-winning documentary filmmaker and Victoria University of Wellington film lecturer Dr Paul Wolffram, will have its first public screening on 26 July.

“I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to screen this film throughout the country for a home audience after three years of production,” says Dr Wolffram. “I think this is a film that will resonate widely with New Zealand audiences as a story about who we are and how we think about the land we live in and the way it speaks to us.”

The film documents Nunn’s journey as he reflects on his more than 30 years working and learning from Māori communities and coming to understand the unique instrumentation of taonga pūoro. It also explores his current struggle with Parkinson's disease which threatens his ability to continue performing. The film accompanies Nunns and Māori musician and composer Horomona Horo as they perform in a series of South Island wilderness settings.

“We travelled throughout the South Island from Takaka to Fiordland with more than 15 locations in between. The film enables an audience to see and hear the ways in which the landscape can be understood as having a voice and even its own music.”

Dr Wolffram first met Nunns when the filmmaker was an undergraduate studying ethnomusicology at Victoria University’s music school. “His example of seeking to understand the music and culture of other communities in depth through long-term engagement was one of the inspirations to pursue my doctorate on the music and dance of an isolated community in the rainforests of Papua New Guinea,” says Dr Wolffram.

Nunns will be attending the Wellington premiere, where he will see the final cut of the documentary for the first time. After two Wellington screenings, the film will travel around the country with the film festival and go on to screen overseas.

Nga Reo O Te Whenua – Voices of the Land’ was supported by Victoria University of Wellington and the New Zealand Film Commission. It is edited by Annie Collins with cinematography by Alun Bollinger and sound by Tim Prebble.

In 2012 Dr Wolffram received the Jean Rouch prize from the Society for Visual Anthropology in San Francisco for Stori Tumbuna: Ancestors’ Tales, his feature-length documentary about the Lak people of Papua New Guinea.

The Wellington screenings are at Soundings Theatre at Te Papa on Saturday 26 July, 3pm and Tuesday 29 July at 1.30pm.


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


13/10: 40 Years Since The Māori Land March Arrived At Parliament

Traffic into Wellington came to a standstill as thousands of Māori and Pākehā streamed along the motorway into the capital on 13 October 1975, concluding the Māori land march to parliament. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Before The Quakes

Remembering Christchurch: Voices from decades past: The Christchurch I lived in for my first 23 years was where four-year-olds walked alone to kindergarten, crossing roads empty of all but a couple of cars per hour. My primary school, Ilam, was newly built on a grassy paddock surrounded by rural land... More>>

6-11 October: New Zealand Improvisation Festival Hits Wellington

Wellingtonians will have a wide selection of improv to feast on with a jam packed programme containing 22 shows, three companies from Australia, two companies from Auckland, one from Nelson, one from Christchurch and seven from Wellington. More>>


Bird Of The Year: New Zealanders Asked To Vote For Their Favourite Native Bird

Te Radar, David Farrier, Heather du-Plessis Allan and Duncan Garner are just some of the New Zealanders championing their favourite native bird in Forest & Bird’s annual Bird of the Year competition, which kicks off today.. More>>


Werewolf Film: It Follows - Panic In Detroit

Philip Matthews: When you heard last month that Wes Craven had died and you wanted to pay homage, you could have sat down with any one of five of his films that helped reinvent American horror at least three times over three decades... Or you could just have watched one of the greatest recent horror films that would probably not exist without Craven. More>>


Werewolf Music: Searching For The White Wail - On Art Pepper, etc

If the word ‘hipster’ means anything – which it arguably doesn’t – it seems to be more of an impulse than a condition. One always headed for the margins, and away from the white-bred, white-bread mainstream... More>>


Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news