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Take Back the Hood: Little Red on Surviving Post-Wolf

For Immediate Release: Take Back the Hood

“Grim, funny, brilliantly wicked… In fact I enjoy pretty well everything about Take Back the Hood.”
-Terry MacTavish, Theatreview
“Humorous, clever, and brave”

-Lori Leigh, Theatreview
Nominated for Best Solo Show, New Zealand Fringe Festival, 2013

Written and Performed by Deborah Eve Rea

19-23 August 7pm, BATS Theatre, corner of Cuba and Dixon St, Wellington
Tickets: $18/$14 www.bats.co.nz, 04 802 4175

Take Back the Hood: Little Red on Surviving Post-Wolf

“Being a fairy-tale heroine is really lonely, because no one gets your shit.” Red, Take Back the Hood

Take Back the Hood is a one-woman, adults-only, modern retelling of Little Red Riding Hood in which Red explores, reclaims and liberates her “story”.

Little Red Riding Hood is all grown up and she’s pissed that she is the moral of a story used to control children. She’s spreading the truth of her tale to the masses. Are you ready to be liberated?

In a world of victim blaming, ACC’s mental injury proving, slut-walks and Twilight, how has our post-wolf Red been able to cope? Armed with a keyboard, a microphone and metaphor, Red pokes fun and stirs thought on New Zealand and Fairy-tale politics. Take Back the Hood is a comedy that is risky, rough and dirty but articulate and sophisticated and it’ll even smack you in the feels at points.

Take Back the Hood is solely created and performed by Deborah Eve Rea. Deborah Eve Rea is currently on the big screen in indie feature film Jake and The Inheritance, which is showing in the International Film Festival. She appears regularly in Wellington theatre and on television. Deborah is the founder and teacher of Wonderplay drama classes in Island Bay and Churton Park and has written and directed their big show, Heebie Jeebies, coming up in September.

Take Back the Hood is inspired by performance art, poetry, Red Mole, Split Britches, Ana Mendieta and the legitimate Todd Akin. In 2012, Deborah Eve Rea received a grant from Asia NZ to attend the Magdalena, Women’s Theatre Festival where she met, worked with and watched leading international women in theatre such as Julia Varley, Keiin Yoshimura, Cristina Castrillo and Jill Greenhalgh. The experience has served as her biggest influence in creating this work.

In 2013, Take Back the Hood was performed in the New Zealand Fringe Festival in Wellington where it was nominated for Best Solo Show and Best marketing. The piece was originally staged as Deborah Eve Rea’s Toi Whakaari Go Solo project in 2012. This year it was performed as part of the 2014 Dunedin Fringe Festival and in Palmerston North at The Dark Room.

Take Back the Hood is supported by EAT Wellington.

twitter.com/TakeBacktheHood facebook.com/TakeBacktheHood


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