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Digital journal to launch emerging literary careers

21 July 2014

Digital journal to launch emerging literary careers

Digital journal start-up Headland will launch a Boosted campaign today [21 July 2014], to create a new platform for novice and established Kiwi writers to share their talent around the world. Accessible through, Headland will publish quality short literary fiction and creative non-fiction stories.

Headland co-founders Liesl Nunns and Laura McNeur said they picked the title with the end goal in mind.
“Headland, by definition, is a word that invokes bravery. We are setting out to establish an online home for literary acts of courage and create a journal that we ourselves would love to read.”

Headland seeks to create portable moments of escape, exploration and reflection for readers, using a convenient and popular format. Nunns and McNeur said New Zealand was home to remarkable literary talent, and Headland, with its tagline Literary Frontiers and Emerging Voices, was a springboard for writers to explore and develop their potential, and showcase their early-career works.

From September, Headland will welcome submissions from New Zealand and around the world, and will publish at least 75% New Zealand content in every issue. With no subject parameters, writers are free to submit on any topic.

Using the Arts Foundation crowdfunding platform Boosted, the pair are hopeful of reaching their target of $3000 to cover start-up costs. They plan to launch the first issue of Headland in January 2015.

The Boosted campaign runs 21 July–20 August.

Further information:


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