Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Orchestra Wellington presents The Song of the Nightingale

Orchestra Wellington presents The Song of the Nightingale

7:30pm, Saturday August 9
Michael Fowler Centre

Featuring: Jian Liu, piano
Marc Taddei, conductor

Haydn: Symphony No. 83 in G minor, The Hen
Ravel: Piano Concerto in G
Stravinsky: Song of the Nightingale
Rimsky-Korsakov: The Golden Cockerel

6:30pm: Free pre-concert talk with Music Director, Marc Taddei, and guest(s).

On Saturday, August 9, pianist Jian Liu joins Orchestra Wellington for Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G, a work combining Gallic sass and sparkle with moments of bluesy reflection.

Liu has become a sought-after soloist throughout New Zealand since taking up his position as Lecturer in Piano at the New Zealand School of Music. His performances convey a sense of ease and an infectious enjoyment for the music, but underneath the charm lies a ferociously brilliant technique.

Ravel is followed by two Russians with a similar flair for colour. Stravinsky created The Song of the Nightingale by adapting music from his opera of the same name, based on the famous Hans Christian Andersen story. The orchestra displays all its sonorities as a mechanical nightingale and a real forest bird compete for the attention of an Emperor.

The modern Russian taste for musical satire did not come out of nowhere. Rimsky-Korsakov’s last works include The Golden Cockerel, a suite drawn from his 1907 opera satirising Russian imperialism. It is a coded reaction to the disastrous, unpopular Russo-Japanese war and the violent repression that was already beginning to mar the country’s entry into the 20th century.

Orchestra Wellington has made Haydn’s Paris symphonies a feature of this season; appropriately for this bird-themed concert, the orchestra opens with Symphony 83, named The Hen. Though a gentle clucking theme in the first movement gives this symphony its name, much of its music is stormy and dramatic.

Tickets: $15 to $55 from Ticketek 0800 842 538; Service fee will apply

www.orchestrawellington.co.nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: No Pretence. No Bullshit. Fine Poem.

John Dickson doesn’t publish much; never has. Indeed, this new collection is his first such in 18 years. As he wryly and dryly states,

I’ve published two slim volumes, and spent all
My time working on the next.
(from Wasp p.67) More>>

Scoop Review of Books: Extraordinary Anywhere: Essays On Place From Aotearoa NZ

The New Zealand landscape undoubtedly is very beautiful, but so is the British one, and my attachment to this country is much more about some particular places, and the memories and emotions that in them combine, than it is about the landscape as a whole. More>>

Canonisation Fodder: Suzanne Aubert Declared ‘Venerable’

Suzanne Aubert, the founder of the Sisters of Compassion New Zealand’s home grown order of Sisters, has been declared ‘venerable’, a major milestone on the path to sainthood in the Catholic Church. More>>

“I Have Not Performed Well Enough”: Ernie Merrick Leaving Wellington Phoenix

Ernie Merrick has stepped down from his position as Wellington Phoenix FC Head Coach. The club would like to thank Ernie for his contribution to Wellington Phoenix and wish him all the best in his future endeavours. More>>

Ray Columbus: NZ Music Icon Passes Away

60s New Zealand music Icon Ray Columbus has passed away peacefully at his home north of Auckland... Ray Columbus enjoyed more than three decades at the top of NZ entertainment as a singer, songwriter, bandleader, music manager and TV star. More>>

Review: Bernard Herrmann's Scores For 'Vertigo' & 'Psycho'

Howard Davis: The NZSO's adventurousness was richly-rewarded, as the deeply appreciative Wellington audience was given the opportunity not only to see a couple of Alfred Hitchcock's greatest films, but also to hear fine renditions of two of Bernard Herrmann's most accomplished film scores. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Leonard Cohen

If Bob Dylan owned the 1960s, Leonard Cohen was an inescapable presence during the early 1970s period, pre-disco and pre-punk. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Pick And Camera

Through the eyes of a miner – the photography of Joseph Divis: The occupations of miner and photographer are seldom combined. The conjunction must have been very rare indeed in the era before hand-held cameras, high-speed film and flashlights More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news