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Shark Tales!

Shark Tales!

Two Adrenaline-Fuelled Live Shows This Week
Coral, Fire, & Ice: Explore Secret Underwater Worlds with David Doubilet
Wellington Thurs 7 August Te Papa National Museum (Soundings Theatre)
Auckland Sat 9 August Aotea Centre (ASB Theatre) TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE
Bookings: 0800 111999 | ticketmaster.co.nz

National Geographic adventurer David Doubilet is set to arrive in New Zealand, ready to take Kiwis to the wildest places above and below the earth -- in two live shows this week.

His shows, Coral, Fire, & Ice: Explore Secret Underwater Worlds, will take Wellington and Auckland audiences to the world’s “coral triangle’’ then to the sculptural icebergs and shipwrecks in the icy waters of Antarctica.

Appealing to those inspired by travel, exploration, discovery – and who value the National Geographic Society’s mission to inspire people to care about the planet – National Geographic Live is for adventurers, thinkers, nature lovers and explorers of all ages.

Coral, Fire, & Ice: Explore Secret Underwater Worlds with David Doubilet
“Kimbe Bay is a world more alien than the edges of space.”—David Doubilet

Photographer David Doubilet has spent five decades under the surface in the far corners of the world, including interior Africa, remote tropical coral reefs, rich temperate seas and recent projects in the northern and southern ice. He has photographed more than 70 stories for National Geographic reporting on coral reefs, historic shipwrecks, ocean predators, and exotic marine creatures.
David’s personal challenge is to create a visual voice for the world’s oceans and to connect people to the incredible beauty and silent devastation happening within the invisible world below.

In “Coral, Fire, and Ice,” he takes audiences across three continents. First , to the rich and diverse waters of Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, part of the “coral triangle” that is the centre of the world in terms of marine biodiversity. Then, journeying south to the cold ice filled waters of Antarctica, Doubilet moves through and under the ice to capture images of the hidden world of the leopard seal, penguins, shipwrecks and his newest work on the sculptural beauty of icebergs. Finally, his photographic journey takes audiences up north to Canada’s Gulf of St. Lawrence to capture an extraordinary world of whales, wolfish, salmon, and harp seals, a remarkable creature fighting to survive in a world of shrinking sea ice.

David Doubilet reveals never-before-seen images from his assignments and the reality of life behind the camera¾from parasites to harp seal bites¾as he shares his adventures working to get the best shot. The author of 12 titles including the award wining Water Light Time, David is the recipient of Picture of the Year, BBC Wildlife, Communication Arts and World Press awards as well as a member of the Academy of Achievement, International League of Conservation Photographers, International Diving Hall of Fame and a Trustee of the Shark Research Institute.

His images are prized for both their scientific value and their aesthetic beauty. He is endowed with a keen sense of humor and the ability to speak poetically about his subjects.

ends

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