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Wellington’s First Ever Pay What You Want Exhibition

Wellington’s First Ever Pay What You Want Exhibition (probably)

‘Spirit of the Beehive’

An exhibition of prints and paintings exploring the world of bees and beekeeping.

At: Vincents Art Workshop

When: Opening 5.30pm Wed 13 August 2014 (all welcome). Runs until 27 August 2014.

Finding no more room under his bed, artist Simon Gray has decided to have a clear out and offer the last ten years of his work for sale. Rather than pursuing the traditional (and tricky) route of pricing his art, he has decided to let the buyer pay what the art work is worth to them. When people buy the work they get to enjoy it, Gray gets his work seen by others and the space back under his bed!

Gray has been an artist for the past twenty five years and also a facilitator of community and school based projects, both in New Zealand and the UK.

“One of first things I did when arriving in New Zealand in 2002 was to take a beekeeping course and ever since they have been a central theme in my work.”

Beekeeper, artist and tutor at Vincents Art Workshop, Simon Gray’s exhibition explores the fascinating and topical subject of bees and beekeeping through painting and printmaking. The work has been produced over the last 10 years during which Gray has kept bees.

In a first for Vincents, and possibly New Zealand, the work in the exhibition is to be sold on a “pay what you want” model. Quite simply: pay what the work means to you.

Also 25% of each work sold will be donated to the Save Our Bees Charitable Trust, which:

“has been founded to conserve and protect New Zealand Honey Bees. Its aims are to educate people about the importance of bees in New Zealand horticultural and agricultural industries and in the home garden.”

ends

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