Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Manchester Orchestra announce one New Zealand show only

ONE NEW ZEALAND SHOW ONLY
POWERSTATION - NOVEMBER 17th

Manchester Orchestra are making their long-awaited New Zealand debut, performing a one off show at the iconic Auckland venue, The Powerstation on November 17.

The band will be performing their new full-length album, Cope, along with tracks from their extensive back catalogue.

Frontman Andy Hull, lead guitarist Robert McDowell, keyboardist/percussionist Chris Freeman, bassist Andy Prince and drummer Tim Very completed nearly 30 tracks for the album that were cut down to the 11 for the final release.

The album is the first for the band since 2011’s concept album Simple Math. “Whereas Simple Math was a different palate with each song, a different colour”, the band had a different direction for Cope, “I wanted this to be black and red the whole time”, explains Hull.

Manchester Orchestra has always been about truth and passion. It’s why Alternative Press gave (USA) MO’s 2009 acclaimed Mean Everything to a five-star lead review that called the album “a masterpiece of intricacy and honesty.” You can feel their passion in the power of Andy Hull’s voice and the fury of the band’s music in every track they’ve ever laid down, a power that wraps itself around you and demands your attention as Hull’s lyrics guide you through the world as he sees it.

With no other New Zealand shows or tour dates announced, the passion and intensity found within the band's catalogue translates into a live show not to be missed.

MANCHESTER ORCHESTRA

THE POWERSTATION

NOVEMBER 17th

With support from Clap Clap Riot and Kevin Devine

Tickets on sale via Ticketmaster Monday 18th August

For further information visit www.themanchesterorchestra.com

##ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news