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Leading American Horse Trainer to Host Wairarapa Clinics

Leading American Horse Trainer to Host Wairarapa Clinics


Internationally-acclaimed American horse trainer Farah DeJohnette will be visiting New Zealand in November to deliver a series of horsemanship clinics.

Farah brings a unique approach to equine training, developed over more than 20 years in the industry. Her skills derive from both her competitive experience and years of honing her horsemanship skills through natural, classical and holistic approaches.

Her clinics are tailored to suit all riders from novice to advanced professional and will be centered on the Farah DeJohnette Horsemanship (FDH) framework. The framework focuses on the relationship between horse and rider and three important leadership elements: connection, communication and trust.

“Technique, though important in a lot of areas of horsemanship, is only half of the process,” explained Farah. “Connection is the other half, and is often the missing component: not just in pleasure partnerships, but also in highly-trained professional and performance partnerships.

“If I put my connection with my horse first, it builds a natural desire to perform in the horse."

The FDH framework generally starts with the horses ‘at liberty’, free to move in a wide-open space and with no equipment.

“At liberty, the horse is given the freedom to choose to connect with us, as he would with another horse in his herd. This creates a willing, positive attitude, where we can build the technical foundation of all disciplines. There is a natural progression through several exercises which helps to develop a willingness and desire from the horse to work with us, without the use of a ‘do it or else’ method.

“It’s horsemanship that challenges people to think outside the round pen: no rope halters, no round pens needed. It uses body language, connection and communication. From liberty, ground to mounted progression is simple, fun for the horse and person, and easy to apply,” she said.

Farah feels she is not defined by one particular training method and has gained her exceptional experience from working with a number of master horsemen of jumping, dressage, western and natural horsemanship, as well as her own study and experience in a wide range disciplines, horse breeds and temperaments.

Farah has just acquired a farm in Massachusetts where she plans to offer intensive study, workshops, training, instruction and her online program.

“The horses have been the greatest teachers I’ve had. I’m not defined by one training method, I’m a horseman. There is only one kind of training and one kind of riding and it’s called horsemanship.”

The FDH clinics will take place at the New Zealand Riding for the Disabled arena, Masterton, Wairarapa, 14 -18 November.

A two-hour demonstration will take place on the Friday and participants can win the chance to spectate at the three-day FDH clinic and receive a private session with Farah.

Prices range from $10 for the demonstration event to $650 for the three-day clinic.

For more details on the FDH Masterton clinic click here.

ends

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