Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Leading American Horse Trainer to Host Wairarapa Clinics

Leading American Horse Trainer to Host Wairarapa Clinics


Internationally-acclaimed American horse trainer Farah DeJohnette will be visiting New Zealand in November to deliver a series of horsemanship clinics.

Farah brings a unique approach to equine training, developed over more than 20 years in the industry. Her skills derive from both her competitive experience and years of honing her horsemanship skills through natural, classical and holistic approaches.

Her clinics are tailored to suit all riders from novice to advanced professional and will be centered on the Farah DeJohnette Horsemanship (FDH) framework. The framework focuses on the relationship between horse and rider and three important leadership elements: connection, communication and trust.

“Technique, though important in a lot of areas of horsemanship, is only half of the process,” explained Farah. “Connection is the other half, and is often the missing component: not just in pleasure partnerships, but also in highly-trained professional and performance partnerships.

“If I put my connection with my horse first, it builds a natural desire to perform in the horse."

The FDH framework generally starts with the horses ‘at liberty’, free to move in a wide-open space and with no equipment.

“At liberty, the horse is given the freedom to choose to connect with us, as he would with another horse in his herd. This creates a willing, positive attitude, where we can build the technical foundation of all disciplines. There is a natural progression through several exercises which helps to develop a willingness and desire from the horse to work with us, without the use of a ‘do it or else’ method.

“It’s horsemanship that challenges people to think outside the round pen: no rope halters, no round pens needed. It uses body language, connection and communication. From liberty, ground to mounted progression is simple, fun for the horse and person, and easy to apply,” she said.

Farah feels she is not defined by one particular training method and has gained her exceptional experience from working with a number of master horsemen of jumping, dressage, western and natural horsemanship, as well as her own study and experience in a wide range disciplines, horse breeds and temperaments.

Farah has just acquired a farm in Massachusetts where she plans to offer intensive study, workshops, training, instruction and her online program.

“The horses have been the greatest teachers I’ve had. I’m not defined by one training method, I’m a horseman. There is only one kind of training and one kind of riding and it’s called horsemanship.”

The FDH clinics will take place at the New Zealand Riding for the Disabled arena, Masterton, Wairarapa, 14 -18 November.

A two-hour demonstration will take place on the Friday and participants can win the chance to spectate at the three-day FDH clinic and receive a private session with Farah.

Prices range from $10 for the demonstration event to $650 for the three-day clinic.

For more details on the FDH Masterton clinic click here.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Obituary: Andrew Little Remembers Murray Ball

“Murray mined a rich vein of New Zealand popular culture and exported it to the world. Wal and Dog and all the other Kiwi characters he crafted through Footrot Flats were hugely popular here and in Australia, Europe and North America." More>>

ALSO:

Organised Choas: NZ Fringe Festival 2017 Awards

Three more weeks of organised chaos have come to an end with the Wellington NZ Fringe Arts Festival Awards Ceremony as a chance to celebrate all our Fringe artists for their talent, ingenuity, and chutzpah! More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Wellington Writer Wins $US165,000 Literature Prize

Victoria University of Wellington staff member and alumna Ashleigh Young has won a prestigious Windham-Campbell Literature Prize worth USD$165,000 for her book of essays Can You Tolerate This? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: We’re All Lab Rats

A couple of years ago, there were reports that Silicon Valley executives were sending their children to tech-free schools. It was a story that dripped of irony: geeks in the heart of techno-utopia rejecting their ideology when it came to their own kids. But the story didn’t catch on, and an awkward question lingered. Why were the engineers of the future desperate to part their gadgets from their children? More>>

  • CensusAtSchool - Most kids have no screen-time limits
  • Netsafe - Half of NZ high school students unsupervised online
  • Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Culture
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news