Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Page & Blackmore Readers and Writers Nelson Arts Festival

Page & Blackmore Readers and Writers Nelson Arts Festival October 16-27 2014

The bets are on in Nelson as to how long Eleanor Catton’s session at the local arts festival will take to sell out, when tickets go on sale tomorrow (Saturday 9 August).

“Call me cautious but I give it four weeks,” says Page & Blackmore Readers and Writers’ coordinator Jacquetta Bell. “Arts festival director Sophie Kelly reckons a week and Thomas at Page & Blackmores says four days!”

Bell says while she’s thrilled to have the Man Booker prize winner leading the line up for the festival, which runs from October 16-27, there are 13 other great events and two writers’ workshops.

“After years of pleading, crime fiction fans can meet their darling Paul Cleave, and we’re really pleased to to host Central Otago artist Grahame Sydney whose retrospective collection of works will be fresh out from our local stars Craig Potton Publishing,” she said.

Others on the list include long-time peace activist Maire Leadbeater on the role protest played in making New Zealand nuclear free, Damien Fenton presenting his book on the nation-building carnage and heroism of World War 1, and Auckland University Professor Davinia Caddy who will be on stage with La Vida string quartet to unravel the mysteries of classical music.

As in past years most sessions are on the weekends of the festival at the Granary Festival Café, but Bell says there are a couple of events that take a new tack.

“This year we’re offering a girlish lunch with Woman’s Day columnist Sarah-Kate Lynch who recently turned 50, shot off to Paris to buy shoes and turned it all into a book called Screw You Dolores,” she said. “And we have an evening gig with Duncan Sarkies and pianist Sean O’Brien, in The Demolition Of The Century, where private investigator Tom Spotswood loses his job, his socks and, most worryingly, his son.”

There are two ‘Thinking Brunch’ panel discussions – the first is on the future of public broadcasing, to be discussed by Radio NZ CEO Paul Thompson, Karyn Hay from Radio Live, Carol Hirschfeld from Maori Television, TVNZ’s Tim Wilson and avid listener Judy Finn. In the second brunch a week later, visiting writers are joined by a couple of locals on the topic of war, peace and the shaping of the Kiwi identity.

Readers & Writers wraps up with Poetry in the Vineyard at the lovely Woollaston Estates on Labour Day, where Victoria University’s Harry Ricketts will deliver a selection of his poems - noted for their deftly satiric touch and wry personal commentaries.

Nelson City Councillor Matt Lawrey will chair the Thinking Brunches and a session on Tim Wilson’s pacey media satire News Pigs. He said Page & Blackmore’s ongoing support for the Readers and Writers programme had created an event that was eagerly awaited in the city.

"Not only is Page & Blackmore Nielsen's New Zealand Bookshop of the Year, it's a Trafalgar St landmark and a huge contributor to the arts and culture in Nelson. It's also owned and run by very nice people," he said. “As the event producers, the Nelson City Council would like to acknowledge Jacquetta Bell’s efforts in once again delivering a programme practically pulsing with intelligence, creativity, insight, beauty and humour.

‘Nelson's love of the arts and culture is one of the things that defines our city and makes it such a great place to live. That's why the Council is happy to support Page & Blackmore Readers and Writers - Nelsonians can really be proud of this event.”

The Nelson Arts Festival (October 16-27) is presented annually by the Nelson City Council as a celebration for locals and an attraction for visitors. More information and tickets at www.nelsonartsfestival.co.nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Obituary: Andrew Little Remembers Murray Ball

“Murray mined a rich vein of New Zealand popular culture and exported it to the world. Wal and Dog and all the other Kiwi characters he crafted through Footrot Flats were hugely popular here and in Australia, Europe and North America." More>>

ALSO:

Organised Choas: NZ Fringe Festival 2017 Awards

Three more weeks of organised chaos have come to an end with the Wellington NZ Fringe Arts Festival Awards Ceremony as a chance to celebrate all our Fringe artists for their talent, ingenuity, and chutzpah! More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Wellington Writer Wins $US165,000 Literature Prize

Victoria University of Wellington staff member and alumna Ashleigh Young has won a prestigious Windham-Campbell Literature Prize worth USD$165,000 for her book of essays Can You Tolerate This? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: We’re All Lab Rats

A couple of years ago, there were reports that Silicon Valley executives were sending their children to tech-free schools. It was a story that dripped of irony: geeks in the heart of techno-utopia rejecting their ideology when it came to their own kids. But the story didn’t catch on, and an awkward question lingered. Why were the engineers of the future desperate to part their gadgets from their children? More>>

  • CensusAtSchool - Most kids have no screen-time limits
  • Netsafe - Half of NZ high school students unsupervised online
  • Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Culture
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news