Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Explore the legacy of WWI writing with literary experts

11 August 2014

Explore the legacy of World War One writing with literary experts

The New Zealand Book Council, with support from Victoria University of Wellington, will explore the legacy of WWI literature in the World War One Book Club. This is an opportunity to hear experts and enthusiasts discuss and dissect favourite writings on the war – from poetry to fiction, diaries to graphic novels.

World War One fervour is spreading in New Zealand as the hundred year anniversary is marked, causing everything from traffic congestion to a rash of poppy lapel badges. But among the history, the geography and the hagiography, what is the place for the literature of the Great War?

Kate Camp, Harry Ricketts, Jane Stafford and special guests will present three Tuesday evening panel events about World War One literature at the City Gallery Wellington.

‘War literature is a genre that appeals equally to men and women, young and old, pacifists and war nerds,’ says panellist Kate Camp. ‘The World War One Book Club is a chance to discover or revisit some of the great works from this ever-popular genre.’

The World War One Book Club discussion starts early on the New Zealand Book Council’s online readers’ hub with reading lists for the events, book recommendations, features and debate: http://booknotes-unbound.org.nz/tag/world-war-one-book-club/.

Event 1: World War One book club – The war poets

Tuesday 26 August, 6pm, at City Gallery Wellington (free admission)

With Kate Camp, Harry Ricketts, Jane Stafford and guest Dave Armstrong
A lively discussion exploring the power and appeal of the war poets. Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen and their contemporaries began as radical debunkers, but have they become comfortable clichés of war?

Event 2: World War One book club – Dispatches from the front
Tuesday 2 September, 6pm, at City Gallery Wellington (free admission)

With Kate Camp, Harry Ricketts, Jane Stafford and guest Kate Hunter
A freewheeling look at literature from the front lines, including All Quiet on the Western Front, Testament of Youth, and We Shall Not Cease. What makes the accounts of soldiers, nurses and pacifists more than mere diaries? And how did a German novel become the most influential account of fighting in World War One?

Event 3: World War One book club – Great books about the Great War
Tuesday 9 September, 6pm, at City Gallery Wellington (free admission)
With Kate Camp, Harry Ricketts, Jane Stafford and guest Matt Elliott
In recent years World War One has been the subject of graphic novels, children’s books, film and theatre, as well as bestselling novels like Pat Barker’s Regeneration trilogy and Sebastian Faulks’
Birdsong. The panel discusses personal favourites, and considers the enduring appeal of the Great War for great writers.

Visit www.booknotes-unbound.org.nz to suggest questions and add to the reading list.

The World War One Book Club is proudly presented by the New Zealand Book Council with support from Victoria University of Wellington, and is hosted by City Gallery Wellington in association with their exhibition Chris Marker, Owls at Noon Prelude: The Hollow Men.

Kate Camp is a poet and broadcaster.
Harry Ricketts is a poet and biographer. His latest publication is How We Remember: New Zealanders and the First World War (Victoria University Press 2014).
Jane Stafford is a professor in the English programme at Victoria University of Wellington.
Dave Armstrong is a playwright and columnist for the Dominion Post.
Kate Hunter is Associate Professor in the School of History, Philosophy, Political Science & International Relations at Victoria University of Wellington.
Matt Elliott is an historian and biographer, and the author of the graphic novel Nice Day for a War: Adventures of a Kiwi Soldier in World War I (HarperCollins NZ, 2011).

For further information about the World War One Book Club please visit www.bookcouncil.org.nz and www.booknotes-unbound.org.nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: No Pretence. No Bullshit. Fine Poem.

John Dickson doesn’t publish much; never has. Indeed, this new collection is his first such in 18 years. As he wryly and dryly states,

I’ve published two slim volumes, and spent all
My time working on the next.
(from Wasp p.67) More>>

Scoop Review of Books: Extraordinary Anywhere: Essays On Place From Aotearoa NZ

The New Zealand landscape undoubtedly is very beautiful, but so is the British one, and my attachment to this country is much more about some particular places, and the memories and emotions that in them combine, than it is about the landscape as a whole. More>>

Canonisation Fodder: Suzanne Aubert Declared ‘Venerable’

Suzanne Aubert, the founder of the Sisters of Compassion New Zealand’s home grown order of Sisters, has been declared ‘venerable’, a major milestone on the path to sainthood in the Catholic Church. More>>

“I Have Not Performed Well Enough”: Ernie Merrick Leaving Wellington Phoenix

Ernie Merrick has stepped down from his position as Wellington Phoenix FC Head Coach. The club would like to thank Ernie for his contribution to Wellington Phoenix and wish him all the best in his future endeavours. More>>

Ray Columbus: NZ Music Icon Passes Away

60s New Zealand music Icon Ray Columbus has passed away peacefully at his home north of Auckland... Ray Columbus enjoyed more than three decades at the top of NZ entertainment as a singer, songwriter, bandleader, music manager and TV star. More>>

Review: Bernard Herrmann's Scores For 'Vertigo' & 'Psycho'

Howard Davis: The NZSO's adventurousness was richly-rewarded, as the deeply appreciative Wellington audience was given the opportunity not only to see a couple of Alfred Hitchcock's greatest films, but also to hear fine renditions of two of Bernard Herrmann's most accomplished film scores. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Leonard Cohen

If Bob Dylan owned the 1960s, Leonard Cohen was an inescapable presence during the early 1970s period, pre-disco and pre-punk. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Pick And Camera

Through the eyes of a miner – the photography of Joseph Divis: The occupations of miner and photographer are seldom combined. The conjunction must have been very rare indeed in the era before hand-held cameras, high-speed film and flashlights More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news