Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Changing views

Changing views

When reading a book or watching a film or television show, many of us expect to be taken on a journey involving a character who changes. But where does this desire to see a transformation come from?

Professor Damien Wilkins will explore this question in his inaugural lecture titled “No hugging, some learning: writing and personal change”, and says his goal is perhaps to see some change of thinking by both the optimists and cynics in the audience.

“I want people to think what the other possibilities are when reading a story.

“It’s just as bad to be artificially cheery as it is to be artificially disillusioned.”

The lecture’s title borrows from the TV show Seinfeld, whose writers tried to avoid clichés associated with sitcoms, where “someone learns something and there is hugging at the end of each episode.

“It’s a cathartic release for viewers–seeing the nasty person turn nice or whatever—but the writers of Seinfeld wanted to do something different.

“But once you have that idea that change is a bit lame, what do you write about? In literature, how can you save the precious notion of transformation from this naffness?”

As part of the free public lecture, Professor Wilkins will discuss New Zealand author Dennis McEldowney’s 1957 memoir, The World Regained. “I chose this book because I think it’s a New Zealand classic which is little read.

“Dennis shows us one way of dramatising change which takes into account both pain and joy. It’s a very beautiful book.”

The World Regained gives Dennis’ account of a life-saving operation for his congenital heart condition.

Details

What: No hugging, some learning: writing and personal change

When: 6pm, Tuesday 26 August

Where: Hunter Council Chamber, Level 2, Hunter Building, Gate 2, Kelburn Parade

RSVP by Friday 22 August either by phone 04-463 6700 or email rsvp@vuw.ac.nz with “Wilkins” in the subject line.


ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: Almost Getting Away With Murder

The Black Widow by Lee-Anne Cartier: Lee-Anne Cartier is the sister of the Christchurch man found to have been murdered by his wife, Helen Milner, after an initial assumption by police that his death, in 2009, was suicide. More>>

Howard Davis: Triple Echo - The Malevich/Reinhardt/Hotere Nexus

Howard Davis: The current juxtaposition of works by Ralph Hotere and Ad Reinhardt at Te Papa perfectly exemplifies Jean Michel Massing's preoccupation with the transmigration of imagery in a remarkable triple echo effect... More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Nō Tāu Manawa

Vaughan Rapatahana responds to Fale Aitu | Spirit House by Tusiata Avi.
More>>

9 Golds - 21 Medals: NZ Team Celebrates As Rio 2016 Paralympic Games Close

The entire New Zealand Paralympic Team, led by kiwi sprinter and double gold medallist Liam Malone as flag bearer, are on the bus to the Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro for the Closing Ceremony of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games. There, they will celebrate the fantastic successes of the past 10 days. More>>

ALSO:

New Zealand Improv Festival: The Festival Of Moments To Return To The Capital

The eighth incarnation of the New Zealand Improv Festival comes to BATS Theatre this 4-8 October , with a stellar line-up of spontaneous theatre and instant comedy performed and directed by top improvisors from around New Zealand and the world. More>>

ALSO:

CDF Tim Keating: NZ Somme Centenary

"Our generals also knew what to expect, and they built that knowledge into their planning. Each of the four set-piece attacks was fought with a single brigade, with the expectation that the brigade would be used up. A fresh brigade would then be brought up to conduct the next set-piece..." More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news