Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Māori Television to Screen the Untold Story of Pauly Fuemana

Tuesday August 19, 2014

Māori Television to Screen the Untold Story of Pauly Fuemana

Māori/Niuean singer-songwriter Paul Fuemana shot to fame in 1995 with the song that became New Zealand’s biggest selling record. His story will be told in HOW BIZARRE, screening Monday, August 25 at 9.30pm on Māori Television.

HOW BIZARRE is the second of Māori Television’s new strand of Pakipūmeka New Zealand documentaries and is told through a mix of interviews and archival footage, including footage shot by Pauly himself – on tour, in the studio and at home.

The song How Bizarre redefined the musical landscape of New Zealand and sold more than four million copies worldwide.

It reached number one around the world, including New Zealand, Australia, Germany, South Africa and Canada. In the US the single topped the US Billboard charts with over two million airplays between 1997 and 1998. How Bizarre was in the top 10 in many other countries, including the UK, setting Pauly on the path to fulfilling the promise of the ironically named Otara Millionaires Club (OMC).

HOW BIZARRE starts with Pauly at the height of his fame, appearing twice on the UK music show “Top of the Pops”, sharing the stage with Cher, the Spice Girls, Bryan Adams, Back Street Boys, Sheryl Crow and other ‘90s music icons, and then rewinds to show his rise from the mean streets of Otara to musical stardom.

The documentary explores where the OMC sound came from, including interviews with musical collaborator Alan Jansson, label bosses Andrew Penhallow and Simon Grigg, and Rolling Stone journalist Clinton Walker.

But the heart of the film is in the stories of the people who were closest to Pauly, and who shared his extraordinary and emotional journey from Otara to the heights of international fame and success to the depths of bankruptcy and chronic illness.

HOW BIZARRE also features Pauly’s Mum, Olivia (from whom he was separated at an early age); his wife, Kirstine; and friends, including artist and poet John Pule, rap artist Ermehn, American film star Matthew Modine, and actress Lucy Lawless who collaborated with Pauly on the 2007 hit, “4 All Of Us”.

At times it is emotionally searing as Pauly struggles to deal with the effects of personal losses, bankruptcy and the fading of his international career. But it also reveals Pauly’s enormous talents as a musician, writer and artist. He never stopped producing work, even in his bleakest periods.

HOW BIZARRE, a celebration of the life of Paul Fuemana, will screen on Māori Television next Monday, August 25 at 9.30pm.

DRUG COURT, the next Pakipūmeka New Zealand documentary, will air on Monday, September 1 at 9.30pm, and follows five offenders participating in the Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Court rehabilitation programme.

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Album Review: Donnie Trumpet And The Social Experiments: Surf

Chance the Rapper is one of my favourite rappers of the last couple years. He bought a uniquely fucked up, acid sound with his debut Acid Rap which has demonstrably influenced others including ILoveMakonnen and A$AP Rocky. It’s remarkable that, at such a ... More>>

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Law Society: Sir Peter Williams QC, 1934 - 2015

“Sir Peter was an exceptional advocate. He had the ability to put the defence case for his clients with powerful oratory. His passion shone through in everything he did and said.” Mr Moore says Sir Peter’s lifelong commitment to prison reform was instrumental in ensuring prison conditions and the rights of prisoners were brought to public attention. More>>

ALSO:

CTU: Peter Conway – Family Statement

Peter committed his whole working life to improving the lives of working people, both in unions and, more recently, as the Economist and Secretary of the Council of Trade Unions. He was previously Chair of Oxfam New Zealand and was on the Board of NZ Trade and Enterprise. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news