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New Documentary "Microbirth"

PRESS RELEASE

NEW DOCUMENTARY “MICROBIRTH”
REVEALS THE MICROSCOPIC SECRETS OF CHILDBIRTH

[http://microbirth.com] - The way we give birth has changed dramatically over the past 30 years. Some leading scientists are warning that these changes could have serious repercussions for the lifelong health of our children. “MICROBIRTH” is a new feature-length documentary premiering worldwide on Saturday 20th September 2014.

Featuring prominent scientists from the UK and North America, “Microbirth” examines how modern birth practices could be interfering with critical biological processes potentially making our children more susceptible to disease later in life.

Recent population studies have shown babies born by Caesarean Section have approximately a 20% increased risk of developing asthma, 20% increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes, a similar risk with obesity and slightly smaller increases with gastro-intestinal conditions like Crohn's disease or coeliac disease. These conditions are all linked to the immune system.

“Microbirth” explores several possible explanations. If a baby is born by Caesarean Section, scientists hypothesise this could alter the “seeding” of the baby's microbiome, the critical transfer of good bacteria from mother to baby at birth. Scientists suggest this could lead to the baby's immune system not developing to its full potential. Another hypothesis is the actual process of vaginal birth, including the cocktail of hormones produced during labour, could profoundly affect the baby's immune regulation and metabolism.

Dr Rodney R Dietert, Professor of Immunotoxicology at Cornell University, says, “Over the past 20-30 years, we've seen dramatic increases in childhood asthma, type 1 diabetes, coeliac disease, childhood obesity. We've also seen increases in Caesarean delivery. Does Caesarean cause these conditions? No. What Caesarean does is not allow the baby to be seeded with the microbes. The immune system doesn't mature. And the metabolism changes. It's the immune dysfunction and the changes in metabolism that we now know contribute to those diseases and conditions.”

Dr Matthew Hyde, Research Associate of Neonatal Medicine, Imperial College London says, ”We are increasingly seeing a world out there with what is really a public health time-bomb waiting to go off. And the research we are doing suggests it is only going to get worse, generation on generation. So tomorrow's generation really is on the edge of the precipice unless we can begin to do something about it.”

The film's co-director Alex Wakeford says, “The World Health Organization has stated non-communicable disease has reached epidemic levels. Leading economists have predicted that, by the year 2030, the cost of treating this epidemic could bankrupt global healthcare systems. Governments are extremely concerned about the repercussions of antibiotic resistance and the effect this level of disease could have upon social and economic stability on a global scale. What is not even on their agenda, however, is the possible effect of mode of birth.”

The film's co-director Toni Harman adds, “Caesarean Sections are often essential and can be life-saving. A few leading individuals have been raising the alarm and building up a picture of potential long-term outcomes for some time. Over the last couple of years, more and more people have joined this debate and the weight of this emerging research is painting a very worrying picture in terms of future health across populations. The film raises awareness of the potential importance of “seeding” the microbiome for all babies, whether born naturally or by C-section. This is an issue not just for parents and health professionals, but also for all our world leaders. For surely now is the time for childbirth to be the focus of serious, urgent attention at the highest level?”

Additional Notes

- Short synopsis of “Microbirth”:
"Microbirth" is a new feature-length documentary looking at birth in a whole new way; through the lens of a microscope. Investigating the latest scientific research, the film reveals how we give birth could impact the lifelong health of our children.

http://microbirth.com

- “Microbirth” is an independent production by Alto Films Ltd. The film has been produced and directed by British filmmaking couple, Toni Harman and Alex Wakeford. Their previous film “Freedom For Birth” premiered in over 1,100 public screenings in 50 countries in 2012.

- “Microbirth” will premiere at grass-roots public screenings around the world on Saturday 20th September 2014. The film will then be represented for international broadcast sales as well as being available via online platforms.

- “Microbirth” running time is approx 70 minutes.

- For more information about the film, please visit the websites: [http://oneworldbirth/.net/microbirth] and [http://microbirth.com]

- “Microbirth” includes the following scientists and academics:
RODNEY DIETERT, Professor of Immunotoxicology, Cornell University
MARTIN BLASER, Director of the Human Microbiome Program & Professor of Translational Medicine, New York University
MARIA GLORIA DOMINGUEZ BELLO, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, New York University
PHILIP STEER, Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics, Imperial College, London
NEENA MODI, Professor of Neonatal Medicine, Imperial College, London
MATTHEW HYDE, Research Associate in the Section of Neonatal Medicine, Imperial College, London
SUE CARTER, Professor, Behavioral Neurobiologist, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
ALEECA BELL, Assistant Professor, Dept of Women, Children and Family Health Science,
University of Illinois at Chicago
STEFAN ELBE, Professor of International Relations, University of Sussex and Director of Centre for Global Health Policy
ANITA KOZYRSKYJ, Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta and Co-Principal Investigator, Synergy in Microbiota Research (SyMBIOTA)
JACQUELYN TAYLOR, Associate Professor of Nursing, University of Yale
HANNAH DAHLEN, Professor of Midwifery, University of Western Sydney
LESLEY PAGE, Professor of Midwifery, King's College London and President, Royal

ENDS

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