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Miley’s Pop Porn Is Coming - Lock Up Your Kids

MEDIA RELEASE

21 August 2014

Miley’s Pop Porn Is Coming - Lock Up Your Kids

Family First is encouraging parents to protect their kids from the ‘pop porn’ juggernaut Miley Cyrus who is heading to New Zealand in October.

“Miley Cyrus is demonstrating – very successfully – that her focus is on ridding her fan base of her adoring teen and tween fans from her Hanna Montana days. Parents should take the hint and protect their kids,” says Bob McCoskrie, National Director of Family First NZ.

“A review of her show in Philadelphia which she is bringing to NZ showed that the underlying message of the show is the normalisation of drug use, foul language and a saturation of highly sexualised imagery and content. Even the show has a section where parental guidance is advised. We think parents should take the guidance in advance before buying tickets.”

In her London show, a mother reported that within the first 20 seconds of her gig in front of kids as young as six Miley had said the word ‘motherf***ers’ four times. During a cover version of Jolene, originally recorded by her godmother Dolly Parton, she dropped in the C-word. She reportedly said ‘I’m sure you guys smell of alcohol and you’ve been smoking weed and you’ve been taking tons of pills,’ and told her young fans that smoking weed ‘won’t kill you’.

“This is not freedom and power as claimed by Miley – it is simply porn and the promotion of substance abuse dressed as pop,” says Mr McCoskrie.

A recent survey of mums in the UK found that 75% of parents with daughters said very sexual pop acts were teaching girls they would be ‘judged on their looks, not their achievements or personality’. About half of parents with sons said they were frightened explicit footage made them believe women were ‘too sexually available’ and that they should have ‘unrealistic porn-star-style body shapes’.

“As Australian feminist Melinda Tankard Reist says, the sexualisation of our young is driven by sexualised music videos, magazines, billboards, toys, games, clothing and marketing. As a result, girls are developing physical and mental health problems such as eating disorders, depression and anxiety. Girls as young as seven are ‘self-surveying’ and being hospitalised with eating disorders. The culture is driven by marketers targeting pre-teens with disposable incomes, the rise of pornography and the mainstreaming of pornographic messages.”

“Parents should save their money, protect their children, and expose them to the far more positive messages of celebrating their achievements, their personality and their uniqueness.”

ENDS


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