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Puppetry, Mask and the Serious Laugh by Jacob Rajan

26 September, 2014

Puppetry, Mask and the Serious Laugh by Jacob Rajan in Baycourt series

Actor and play writer Jacob Rajan will present and lead a discussion with the title ‘Puppetry, Mask and the Serious Laugh’ as part of the 2014 Kiss My Arts series in Baycourt Community and Arts Centre, Tauranga. He will demonstrate the role of masks and puppetry used in his Indian Ink Theatre Company, along with the philosophy of the ‘serious laugh’: opening the audiences' mouths with laughter in order to slip something serious in.

Jacob is an Arts Foundation Laureate and founding partner of theatre company Indian Ink. He collaborated to create Krishnan’s Dairy, The Candlestick maker, The Pickle King, The Dentist’s Chair, The Guru of Chai and Kiss the Fish and has performed them throughout New Zealand and internationally. In 2013 he became a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to theatre. Jacob won the Best Actor award in the 2010 Chapman Tripp Theatre Awards for The Guru of Chai. He has also received an accolade for acting excellence and was nominated for the Stage Award for Best Actor at the Edinburgh Fringe. Jacob has featured on New Zealand TV series Outrageous Fortune and Shortland Street.

The Kiss my Arts series is a collaboration of The University of Waikato and Baycourt Community and Arts Centre in Tauranga. Each creative conversation is designed to inform, engage and explore various aspects of the arts.

Thursday 4 September, 5.30pm at Baycourt Community and Arts Centre. Entry is by gold coin donation. NB: Booking is essential, please email with the session name to:


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