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Fear and insecurity holding women back from achieving dreams

26 August 2014

Fear and insecurity holding women back from achieving their dreams

In a new survey from AMP, results reveal the interesting differences in how men and women go about achieving their dreams – with almost double the female respondents (44% vs 28%) saying fear and insecurity has held them back.

This announcement comes as AMP launches its $200,000 AMP ‘Do Your Thing’ Scholarship programme for 2014.

The survey also found around 20% more females say they have been restricted by financial constraints (62%) compared to their male counterparts (43%), and interestingly significantly more women than men thought “any age” is the ideal time to achieve a dream (73% vs 57%).

With Kiwis being such go-getters, it seems women have a slight edge over men in giving their dream or significant goal a try (72% vs 65%) - with almost 20% more female respondents saying family support allowed them to pursue it.

Both men and women agreed that family would benefit most from them achieving their dreams (both at 61%) and surprisingly, more women than men said they would ask their family (37% vs 27%) or the government (34% vs 23%) for financial funding, yet both would still choose a loan as their preferred funding option (48% & 51%).

Both genders were most likely to be inspired by their friends first. Women were inspired by their parents second, with men being inspired by their their colleagues, famous New Zealanders and then their parents.

Jeff Ruscoe, Chief Customer Officer, at AMP says: “With $200,000 available from our Scholarship pool of funds, we hope talented, passionate and determined Kiwis - of any age or gender - will apply to start making their goal a reality.”

“Most people, at some stage in their life have a dream. No matter what age, or point people are in in life, we want to encourage everyone to do their thing and turn their dreams into a reality”, says Ruscoe.

This year, applications for AMP ‘Do Your Thing’ Scholarships are open until 16 September.

www.doyourthing.co.nz

ENDS

Notes to Editor:

About ‘Do Your Thing’:

• AMP ‘Do Your Thing’ applications are open from 21 July 2014 until 16 September 2014.
• Applications for AMP ‘Do Your Thing’ Scholarships must be made through the online Application Form located at www.doyourthing.co.nz.
• In order to be eligible for AMP Scholarships you must be an individual (not a group). You must also be a New Zealand citizen or permanent resident and you must not have been ordinarily residing outside of New Zealand for more than five years as at the date of your Application.
• If you are under 18 years of age you must have the consent of your parent(s) or legal guardian(s) to apply.
• You are not eligible to apply for any AMP Scholarship if you have previously won an AMP Scholarship of any kind before.
• In total, there are 11 National Scholarships available – each consists of one payment of up to a maximum of amount of $10,000.
• Full terms & conditions can be found on www.doyourthing.co.nz

About AMP:

• AMP is a leading wealth management and insurance provider in the New Zealand marketplace and has been supporting the financial welfare of customers for 160 years
• Our customers hold more than 870,000 investment, savings and insurance products
• AMP has one of the largest networks of advisers in New Zealand
• AMP is the only default KiwiSaver provider with both a ‘silver’ rating from Morningstar and a 5 Star Canstar Award
• AMP has approximately 260,000 KiwiSaver Scheme members and more than $3 billion funds under management, equating to around 14% market share
• We’ve awarded more than $1.8 million in the last 16 years through our AMP Foundation
• In 2013 we:
o helped more than 1,800 kiwis buy their first home through KiwiSaver
o paid out $46.75 million in general insurance claims
o supported approximately 73,000 New Zealanders who were unable to work because of an injury or illness by paying out nearly $9 million in income protection insurance
o wrote $644 million in new mortgages, and
o provided advice over the phone to more than 150,000 New Zealanders – more than 400 people per day.

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