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Behind the Brush Brings More Lindauer Paintings to Life

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 26, 2014


Behind the Brush Brings More Lindauer Paintings to Life on Māori Television

The stories of Māori figures painted by the artist Gottfried Lindauer are explored in a new series of BEHIND THE BRUSH, starting Monday September 1 at 8.00pm on Māori Television.

Over seven episodes, BEHIND THE BRUSH reveals the personal stories of 21 fascinating characters in New Zealand’s history through interviews with their descendants.

“This second season of BEHIND THE BRUSH has been challenging as we aim to create something that is not just a television show but also a work of art itself,” says director and executive producer Julian Arahanga, of Awa Films (Songs from the Inside, Once Were Warriors - Where are they Now?).

“We all feel that with this work comes with a huge responsibility to uphold the mana and wairua of our tūpuna. Each day we go to work we are so grateful to have been given the honour to bring these stories to the world.”

The stories are rich and full of drama. One woman swam through a river with her baby on her back to avoid capture and certain death. Another beautiful young girl swept a charming Prince of Wales off his feet.

BEHIND THE BRUSH further traces the life of Gottfried Lindauer, from his early life in the Czech town Pilsen to the Vienna Academy of Fine Arts. His granddaughter Rebe Mason, from Hamilton, also features throughout the series.

BEHIND THE BRUSH is made with the support of Te Māngai Pāho, NZ On Air and Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, which holds the largest collection of Lindauer paintings.

Tune in to BEHIND THE BRUSH on Māori Television from Monday, September 1 at 8.00pm to hear descendants of tūpuna painted by Gottfried Lindauer lift the lid on history.

ENDS

Billings

Episode One – Te Tai Tokerau, September 1
The publican and entrepreneur, the retired warrior who wanted to wrestle Queen Victoria’s lions, and the young MP who dedicated his life to the people.

Episode Two – Politicians, September 8
The first Māori to be knighted, the Māori MP who took on the church to the Supreme Court and man whose writings would prove invaluable for the Ngāi Tahu treaty claim.

Episode Three – Waimārama, September 15
The man Lindauer had a special relationship with, and the whānau who mortgaged the farm to bring their tūpuna home.

Episode Four – Hauraki, September 22
The chief Lindauer painted with a Huia bird as an earring, his cousin who had no time for Pākehā and the chief who as a boy was gifted a nail and a potato by Captain Cook.

Episode Five – Private Collections, September 29
The chief who was responsible for the town of Foxton, the girl who stole the heart of a prince and the pragmatic chief who wanted to set up a Māori parliament.

Episode Six – Te Tai Rāwhiti, October 6
The Major who fought with the crown to advance his people’s cause, the prophet who danced with the rainbow and cultivator of food to feed the people.

Episode Seven – Whanganui, October 13
The old chief who named himself King George, the young warrior determined to make a name for himself and woman whose mana and skill with a taiaha made her a must for large ceremonies.


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