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Shane Cameron to fight Kali Meehan for WBA Heavyweight Crown

Shane Cameron to fight Kali Meehan for WBA Heavyweight Crown


The Mountain Warrior is once again looking to scale the highest heavyweight peaks in a redemption bout against inaugural SUPER 8 Champion, Kali Meehan on the next SUPER 8 Last Man Standing card.

Shane Cameron has agreed terms with SKY Arena and will fight Meehan for the WBA Oceania heavyweight title, as main event and one of two SUPER-fights on November 22 at Auckland’s North Shore Events Centre.

(New Zealand’s top ranked fighter, David Aloua, will also will defend his WBA Pan African and WBO Asia Pacific Cruiserweight crowns against Aussie World number 14, Daniel Baff in the semi-main event.)

After months of reflection in the wake of his shock loss to Brian Minto in December, the 36 year-old heavyweight has a point to prove against the power punching Australian based Kiwi.

“I refuse to resign my legacy to the Minto bout. I under estimated him and wasn’t fully prepared, boxing is a harsh mistress when you don’t treat her with respect.

“I won’t make the same mistake with Kali, I’m taking this fight because I believe I can win and get my career back on track.”

Manager, Ken Reinsfield, is adamant Cameron has the skill and mental toughness to topple Meehan.

“Shane could have taken an easy fight, but that’s not his style, he’s made a career of taking the toughest fights available and that’s what makes him the Mountain Warrior.

“Shane relishes the underdog tag and is highly motivated – don’t forget what he did to Monte Barrett when most people wrote him off.

“Styles make fights, Shane likes to come forward and has a proven history of dismantling taller fighters and Kali is 6 foot 5 and doesn’t like being pressured on the inside.

“Kali knocked out Michael Sprott who beat Brian Minto, so beating Meehan will prove December was simply a bad night at the office.”

SKY ARENA Company Director, John McRae, is ecstatic having such a career-defining bout on the card.

“Prior to Tua Cameron I felt the same level of excitement and intensity from the fighters – this has all the ingredients for an explosive backyard brawl.

“David Tua, Shane and Kali have been the dominant kiwi heavyweights of the past decade, and with Kali’s recent resurgence, this fight is not just about redemption for Shane it’s about setting a legacy.

“Both fought for world titles, both men believe they can knock the other out and the tension is palpable as losing this bout is effectively career ending while winning will set the scene for lucrative future bouts on SKY Arena events.”

ends

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