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An Unseasonable Fall of Snow - return season

Press Release – August/Sept 2014

An Unseasonable Fall of Snow

by Gary Henderson

Starring Jed & Riley Brophy

Directed by Geraldine Brophy

Circa Two from 24 Sept to 4 Oct 2014

Running time: 75 minutes

Recommended Age 14 - 15+ - Not suitable for primary school aged children. Themes and offensive language may disturb some people

Emotional thriller An Unseasonable Fall of Snow was commissioned from multi-award winning playwright Gary Henderson by the NZ Arts Festival in 1998. The themes interwoven throughout the play are as relevant now as then
as issues faced by those marginalised in modern society are prevalent in the media, along with IT whizz kids & whistle-blowers bringing down the creditability of corporates & political regimes and the global economy in decline.

For 75 minutes the two actors (Jed & Riley Brophy) remain on stage as the tale unfolds and the audience join characters Arthur and Liam on a journey of discovery and revelation. Described previously as a whodunit because of the thriller nature, the story explores what has occurred rather than eliminating suspects who may have perpetrated the deed. It is immediately obvious that Liam has committed an act that is either immoral or criminal and Arthur’s job is to extract the truth. The lack of connection we have to action and consequence, let alone an acceptance of responsibility of our actions, is deftly explored with fast paced dialogue severed by poignant silences.

Ross Joblin’s set and Lisa Maule’s lighting design enhance the disconnection of time and place that Geraldine Brophy’s understated yet insightful direction brings to this production.

For an emerging actor, 21-year-old Riley has an impressive array of screen credits, including a Best Actor award for his lead role in Brian Challis' short film ‘Rock' when he was 9 years old. With a prolific career on stage and film his co-star and father, Jed, received the 2009 CTTA Best Actor award for his portrayal of Mal in Paul Rothwell’s play ‘The Blackening'. They have found working together a unique and rewarding experience, for Jed “it is a very special thing to work with your own son as an equal, on an intense and intricate piece of writing that doesn't pull punches and reminds us of the interconnectedness (is that a word) of all things.” Riley adds “we are privileged because there is a tacit level of trust through having known each other all my life that can take weeks of rehearsal to reach with actors you haven’t worked with before.”

Both actors draw on their emotional resources to develop a deep understanding of who Arthur and Liam are, warts and all, allowing the audience moments of disgust and sympathy for both men, “the father and son team of Jed and Riley Brophy dig deep in Henderson's electrifying script to bring out many subtle nuances beyond the actual dialogue.” (Ewen Coleman)

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