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Multi Disciplines Keep 67 Yr Old Masters Games Athlete Fit

WEDNESDAY 3 FEBRUARY
Multi Disciplines Keep 67 Yr Old Masters Games Athlete Fit

On day five of the New Zealand Masters Games, Morris Hall from Dunedin has already won two gold medals in kayaking, gold in the ocean swim, and two golds and two silvers in the swimming pool. He has another swimming event tonight, then lines up for the triathlon tomorrow and on Friday he will be sailing his Laser in the three day yachting event.

At 67years of age, Morris Hall shows no signs of slowing down and has his eyes set on competing in 5 disciplines at the World Masters Games in Auckland in April 2017.

He says he likes mixing up the disciplines because when you get older it’s too hard to run every day. On a typical Saturday he kayak’s in the morning, has a run in the afternoon and then at 5pm swims at the Masters Swimming Club.

“I just feel better because I am fit and if I don’t go out training every day I just feel something is missing. I’m lucky because a lot of people my age have their knees give out but I’m okay.”

Yachting was his first love from the age of 12, then at 33, when fun runs became popular he thought he would give that a go to improve his fitness. That lead to triathlons where he found he loved the swimming. He graduated to the more intense Coast to Coast, he’s competed in that five times and has completed the Ironman three times. He really enjoyed the kayaking so that’s on his list now too. He’s run 52 marathons and has competed at both the 2002 Melbourne and 2009 Sydney World Masters Games.

“I loved both World Masters. You meet so many people from around the world and they are all so friendly. The opening ceremonies were fantastic and the atmosphere was incredible.

“I ran the half marathon at both events, both courses were really scenic. In Melbourne we ran through the zoo and in Sydney we ran around the Olympic village and then finished in the Olympic stadium. You always find a group of people who run at you pace.”

He’s already planning his trip to Auckland next year for the World Masters in April. It’s expected to attract 25,000 athletes.

‘I’ll be driving up and taking my boat with me. That’s the great thing about the Games being in New Zealand you can take all your toys with you. I’m really planning on making a holiday of it.”

Registrations for the 2017 World Masters open in mid-February online at www.worldmastersgames2017.co.nz.

ends

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