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New Zealand’s First Music Therapy Week Announced

New Zealand’s First Music Therapy Week Announced

The healing qualities of music have been recognised in popular culture for centuries, but there’s much more to it than listening to sad music when dealing with heartbreak. The life-changing impact of music therapy is set to be celebrated in New Zealand’s first Music Therapy Week from 21-29 May.

Every week, New Zealand’s 52 registered music therapists work with thousands of clients around the country, from dementia patients to young children with learning difficulties. Music is used as part of a therapeutic toolkit to assist with the healing and personal growth of people of all ages and abilities with identified emotional, intellectual, physical or social needs.

Music therapists often work as members of a clinical team, including at early intervention centres, hospitals, schools, prisons and rest homes, in addition to private practice and working in homes.

Music Therapy New Zealand President Heather Fletcher says the first Music Therapy Week is focused on celebrating music therapy.

“We’re looking forward to telling stories about the measurable difference music therapy is making in the lives of thousands of New Zealanders every month. We are encouraging people to learn about the value of music therapy and how it can support members of their family or community and, in doing so, we aim to raise the profile of music therapy as a profession in New Zealand.”

Music Therapy Week highlights include:
Music Therapy Symposium, University of Auckland Tamaki Campus
Massey University information booth, Wellington
Music Moves Me Trust Movie Night, Cambridge
This is Music Therapy presentation, Christchurch
SoundsWell Singers First Birthday Celebration, Wellington
Drumming Workshop, Wellington
Auckland Regional Group Market stand, Auckland


About Music Therapy New Zealand
Music Therapy New Zealand (MThNZ) works to advance the provision of music therapy to all who will benefit from these services by:

• Developing public awareness and understanding of music therapy;

• Overseeing professional standards and registration of music therapists;

• Encouraging and funding research;

• Providing scholarships for music therapy students and other music therapists;

• Developing relationships with government agencies, community groups, professional and other relevant organisations; and

• Supporting activities to advance the ethical provision of music therapy services.

Registered Music Therapists in New Zealand are employed in a variety of health and education settings in areas such as Early Intervention, Children with Special Educational Needs, Adult Learning Disability, Child & Adolescent Mental Health, Adult Mental Health, Rehabilitation via ACC and Aged Care, amongst others.

Facts and figures

• Music Therapy Week will run from 21-29 May

• There are 52 currently practicing registered music therapists in New Zealand

• Music therapy is funded through a variety of methods, from people paying privately, through to the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Health for sessions within their settings.

• Since 2004, a Master of Music Therapy training course has been available in New Zealand (through Massey University and later Victoria University); all registered music therapists in New Zealand have a Masters or equivalent qualification.

ENDS

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