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Native forest charity will make Christmas trees last forever

MEDIA RELEASE

8th December 2016
Media Release: Native Forest Restoration Trust

Gifts that keep on giving

Native forest charity will make Christmas trees last for ever


This year, Christmas shoppers can buy lasting gifts to support the restoration of New Zealand’s native forest – photo by Philip Moll

What kind of Christmas present shows a loved one you care, creates a lasting memento and benefits generation after generation?

Don’t be stumped, or bark up the wrong tree, or ‘bough’ to big brand pressure this Christmas. According to the Native Forest Restoration Trust it’s time to branch out, go out on a limb and choose a gift that keeps on giving.

The Native Forest Restoration Trust is calling on people to celebrate this festive season with one of its ‘tree-mendous’ gift ideas – and help regenerate New Zealand’s precious natural habitats.

For just $25 you can dedicate a tree in a native forest to someone, or even twin it with your Christmas tree at home. A small grove of native trees can be dedicated for $100.

In return, you will receive a certificate, personalised with your own message, to confirm your dedication. You will be told exactly which nature reserve you are supporting. You will also be sent regular updates from the Trust, so you can see the difference your support makes.

“Most importantly, you will know you have played a part in restoring the indigenous forest on which so much depends – now and in the future,” says Trust Manager Sandy Crichton.

“Our children, and our children’s children, will be able to see the beauty of these forests, appreciate the wildlife they shelter, and enjoy a healthier environment. As the trees grow, they will remove carbon from the atmosphere and help combat climate change.”

Since its beginning in 1980 the Trust has acquired and protected well over 7,000 hectares of native forest and wetland, creating nature reserves throughout the North and South Islands. Each is permanently protected by covenant through the Queen Elizabeth II Trust.

To dedicate a tree or learn more about the Native Forest Restoration Trust, visit www.nfrt.org.nz/dedicate-a-tree/.

Ends

Visit us on Facebook: NativeForestRestorationTrust

Follow us on Twitter: @NZNFRT


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