Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Marae now accessible on mobile devices via Māori Maps site

MEDIA RELEASE

Auckland/Tāmaki-makaurau

16 January / 16 Kohi-tātea 2017

Embargoed until 17 January, 7.00 a.m.

Marae now accessible on mobile devices via Māori Maps site

Māori Maps, the website portal to the 773 tribal marae of New Zealand, is now easily accessible on phones, tablets and other mobile devices.

A major redevelopment of www.maorimaps.com over the past six months culminates in the official relaunch of the site this Monday 16 January.

The revised, responsive design enables browsers to locate marae easily on any device – and adds features including links to marae that are adjacent or related by whakapapa to the marae being searched.

Greater prominence is now given to images of the marae, most of which were taken by renowned photographer Krzysztof Pfeiffer.

The site’s Google Maps base now displays a cluster symbol featuring the number of marae in a given area, and zooming in further on the map begins to reveal the details of individual marae.

Alongside key information and driving directions for each marae, where available there is also data supplied by Chorus to indicate Internet accessibility.

The redevelopment was enabled by a generous donation by The Tindall Foundation to Te Potiki National Trust, the registered charity that administers Māori Maps.

“We are indebted to The Tindall Foundation for their support, which means that users of all media can now locate and link to the ancestral marae of Aotearoa,” commented Dr Paora Tapsell, Chair of Te Potiki National Trust.

“Having a site that displays well on mobile phones is especially important, and will help our varied users to find their way to marae across the country.”

The Auckland-based Te Potiki National Trust aims to reconnect young Māori – the ‘potiki’ generation – to their ancestral identities, while helping marae communities to become more visible and self-sustaining.

“Developing a sense of identity is vital to the well-being of young Māori today, and can help with the many challenges they face in urban New Zealand,” Tapsell said.

At the same time marae themselves, many of which rely on declining populations of elders to keep going, need to connect more closely to their descendants as well as visitors and supporters.

“The Internet is providing an alternative avenue for iwi, hapū and whānau to connect, as seen by the numerous Facebook pages for marae that are referenced on our site,” he noted.

Te Potiki National Trust is now working to complete the full translation of the site into Te Reo and to publish a guidebook to marae, while developing social programmes to reconnect young Māori with their marae.

ENDS

www.maorimaps.com

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: The Typewriter Factory

I finished reading Don’t Dream It’s Over not long after it came out last August. I even started writing a review, which took something of an ‘I’m sorry people, but it’s already over’ approach. I’ve been pretty negative about journalism as it’s practiced in the mainstream (or MSM, or corporate media or liberal media or whatever terminology you prefer) for quite some time (see for example Stop the Press), and I believe the current capitalist media model is destructive and can’t be reformed. More>>

Sheep Update: Solo World Shearing Record Broken In Southland

Southland shearer Leon Samuels today set a new World solo eight-hours strongwool ewe-shearing after a tally of 605 in a wool shed north of Gore. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: Dick Frizzell At The Solander Gallery

One of the most influential and celebrated contemporary Pop artists working in New Zealand, Dick Frizzell is mostly known for his appropriation of kitsch Kiwiana icons, which he often incorporates into cartoon-like paintings and lithographs. Not content with adhering to one particular style, he likes to adopt consciously unfashionable styles of painting, in a manner reminiscent of Roy Lichtenstein. More>>

Old Music: Pop Icon Adam Ant Announces NZ Tour

Following his recent sold out North American and UK tours, Adam Ant is celebrating the 35th anniversary of the release of his landmark KINGS OF THE WILD FRONTIER album with a newly-remastered reissue (Sony Legacy) and Australasian tour. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books:
Looking Back

Writing a memoir that appeals to a broad readership is a difficult undertaking. As an experienced communicator, Lloyd Geering keeps the reader’s interest alive through ten chapters (or portholes) giving views of different aspects of his life in 20th-century New Zealand. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Purple (and Violet) Prose

This is the second recent conjoint publication by Reeve and Stapp; all to do with esoteric, arcane and obscure vocabulary – sesquipedalian, anyone – and so much more besides. Before I write further, I must stress that the book is an equal partnership between words and images and that one cannot thrive without the other. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news