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Walk for Humanity raises thousands for charity

Media Release: 20th March 2017

Walk for Humanity raises thousands for charity

The Ahmadiyya Muslim community of New Zealand held its 9th Annual walkathon on the 18th March 2017. 84 participants walked up to 10 km around the Barry Curtis Park in Flat Bush, raising thousands of dollars through sponsorship. The event is now a regular feature in the community’s annual calendar, with the money raised supporting the New Zealand Blind Foundation, and the Humanity First charities.

“Supporting people in need, as well as helping the poor in one’s community is a central pillar of the Islamic faith. By organising this walk, and reaching out to the wider community to help sponsor the walkers, we are doing nothing more than what we believe to be our duty as true Muslims. It is indeed heartening to see the spirit shown by both the participants, as well as all the volunteers who have worked so hard in the background to make this walk a success” says the community spokesman Dr Nadeem Ahmad. “Blind Foundation and the Humanity First Charities both work very hard to improve the lives of hundreds in our country and beyond. We are humbled that in a small way we can be part of their contribution to the society.”

Members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community, as well as representatives of the Blind Foundation and the AA took part in this year’s walk. Sponsors belonging to local businesses, as well as the nurses and doctors at the Manukau and Auckland District Health Board helped reach a total of over $10,000. The attendees were treated to a barbeque and sausage sizzle after the walk that was sponsored by Mike Pero New Zealand, and its representative Mr Sheikhil Khan gave out special prizes to the individuals with the highest pledge amounts.

Spanning worldwide in over 200 countries, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community is a dynamic, fast-growing international revival movement within Islam with membership exceeding tens of millions. Its motto of ‘Love for all and hatred for none’ is evidenced through the peaceful actions of its millions of followers. The New Zealand branch was established in 1987 and has now expanded to over 500 members. It is a registered charitable organisation and endeavors to be an active and integrated community within New Zealand society.

ENDS


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