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Discover the secrets of the Sun

Discover the secrets of the Sun!

With temperatures reaching millions of degrees, the Sun would certainly leave solar travellers with a few scorch marks. Yet a new exhibition opening at MOTAT allows visitors to get hands-on with Earth’s star at room temperature – no sunscreen required!

Sunlight – Ihi Kōmaru opens in Auckland on Saturday 27 May, shining its light on the secrets of the Sun with easily accessible science that will illuminate young and old. From the origins of light in the Sun’s heart to its effects on Earth’s life and cultures, Sunlight - Ihi Kōmaru presents a full and fascinating spectrum of hands-on exhibits and activities.

Exhibitions Manager at MOTAT Rebecca Britt says the Museum was particularly excited by the interactive nature of Sunlight – Ihi Kōmaru. “Packed with interactive games, challenging activities and immersive multimedia content, this exhibition captures the imaginations of visitors while educating them about the physical phenomena of light in vivid and compelling ways,” says Ms Britt. “We’re thrilled to bring it to Auckland so our visitors can experience it first-hand,” she adds.

The journey begins in the gas and dust of the Sun’s formation. Visitors take the role of a photon on its trip through space and can test their speed against a beam of light by racing to the Moon. Discover how light is created, see how mankind harnesses the Sun’s power in everyday devices and explore what the Sun sounds like by climbing inside an inflatable replica of a star to find out.

Aglow with a galaxy of exciting science, Sunlight - Ihi Kōmaru will help the whole family understand the forces that sustain life on Earth – and indeed drive the entire universe.

Sunlight - Ihi Kōmaru is developed and toured by Te Manawa Museum of Art, Science and History in Palmerston North. This significant science-based exhibition, presented in both English and Te Reo Māori is the 2016 winner of the New Zealand Museums Award for ‘Regional Science and Technology’.

ENDS

Location: MOTAT – 805 Great North Road, Western Springs, Auckland

Times: 10am to 5pm daily

Dates: Saturday 27 May to Sunday 15 October 2017

Normal MOTAT admission fees apply


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