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Future of Kiwi Lifestyle Discussed in ‘What Next?’

Tonight's episode focused on Kiwi lifestyles and our options for maintaining our way of life with growing demands and finite resources

Over the past month, whatnext.nz has asked New Zealand: would you live to the age of 130 if you could?

50% of Kiwis said they would, with men keener to live longer than women. 60% of men would choose to make it to their 130th birthday, while only 45% of women feel the same.

To live that long, we'll need to look at how we will afford an aging population under the current age of retirement. New Zealand has the second oldest workforce in the OECD, and it's continuing to age.

When asked if they expect to ever be able to retire, 75% of Kiwis said yes. Even 75% of under-18s, the group least likely to receive superannuation, believe they'll be able to retire in their old age.

Research from the University of Auckland shows that 64% of Kiwis don't think owning luxury goods is a good thing, yet our personal debt is at an all time high. Nigel and John asked New Zealand if they could make do with less stuff, and 93% said yes.

It's not just our consumer behaviour that needs to be innovated, Nigel and John provide evidence that we are currently in the midst of a housing crisis - there are now 42,000 people homeless in New Zealand, living on the street, in their cars and in garages.

Nigel and John looked at alternatives to our current way of housing, which includes communal living. When asked if New Zealanders would borrow a lawnmower from their neighbour, 75% of Kiwis said yes, indicating that we are open to living in a more communal manner.

The final question Nigel and John put to New Zealand is: should we go with Plan A - maintaining the status quo when it comes to the Kiwi lifestyle, with a small tweaks? Or Plan B – taking a more radical course now to combat the social issues created by an aging and growing population, and a housing crisis? Have your say at whatnext.nz

John and Nigel continue the conversation tomorrow night. Thursday’s episode will take the data presented over the past four nights to create a roadmap for our collective future, LIVE at 8.30pm on TVNZ 1 and tvnz.co.nz.

Catch up on tonight's episode at TVNZ OnDemand.

Click here for images from tonight's episode. For interview requests, please contact Dominica Leonard.

What Next? is made with the support of New Zealand On Air and proudly partnered with the University of Auckland.

ENDS

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