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Translations celebrate culture and wellbeing

Translations celebrate culture and wellbeing

In a New Zealand first, a set of five simple actions proven to improve wellbeing have been translated into multiple languages.

The Five Ways to Wellbeing are a set of five simple, evidence-based actions which have been shown to improve wellbeing in everyday life. They are Keep Learning, Take Notice, Be Active, Give, and Connect.

Already available in English and Te Reo, All Right? has worked with Cantabrians from a variety of different cultures to reinterpret the Five Ways to Wellbeing into eight different languages: Farsi, Nepali, Chinese, Korean, Amharic, Arabic, Hindi and Somali.


All Right? campaign manager Sue Turner says everyone can benefit from incorporating these actions into their everyday life.

“These simple actions are proven to boost the way we feel, even when times are tough,” says Sue Turner.

“We know they work, and want everyone to know about them. Language shouldn’t be a barrier to improved mental health and wellbeing.”

Ahmed Tani from the Canterbury Refugee Resettlement and Resource Council says the resulting resources will help equip different communities with increased knowledge about how to live a happy life.

“We are super diverse, we all have different stories and have been on different journeys. But we all have wellbeing. These resources will help support our communities to talk about what it means to be happy and well,” says Ahmed.

“They provide a platform for people who speak the same language to come together and share each other’s stories.”

Sue Turner says the translations have been led by the communities themselves.

“We haven’t just gone into Google Translate and created some pretty posters. We’ve worked incredibly closely with representatives from the eight communities to reinterpret the five ways so that they make sense. It’s taken some time but the result is definitely worth it.

“We’ve had amazing support for this project. Each community has been really engaged throughout the whole process. It’s been an absolute privilege to be able to create this resource alongside them,” says Sue.

Posters and a pocket-sized resource have been created for the eight languages, each incorporating relevant cultural symbolism. The resources can be viewed and ordered online for free within the Canterbury DHB region at www.allright.org.nz/resources

All Right? would like to thank the Red Cross for contributing funding to this project.

Photos from today’s launch can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/allrightnz/


ENDS


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