Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

Memorial Cinema for NZFC


From the New Zealand Film Commission Friday, 6 October 2017

Memorial Cinema for NZFC


On Tuesday 10 October the New Zealand Film Commission (NZFC) will officially open the Hayward Cinema.

Named in honour of New Zealand cinema pioneers, Rudall and Ramai Hayward, the 20-seat screening room, built in partnership with NZ On Air, is in the same building as the two organisations’ Wellington offices and will be a private screening environment for staff, filmmakers, festival programmers and others to view films and rushes.

Rudall and Ramai Hayward had filmmaking careers that collectively spanned over eighty years. Sixteen years older than Ramai, Rudall was already well established as a filmmaker, and had already made three features and numerous short films when he cast Ramai as the female lead in the 1940 sound remake of his 1925 film, Rewi’s Last Stand. As well as acting and singing in the film, Ramai, who owned and operated an Auckland photography studio, also designed the poster. The pair married in 1943.

This jack-of-all-trades style of filmmaking remained the pair’s modus-operandi throughout their careers. In the late 1940s, they moved to England where Ramai wrote and worked as possibly the only female cinematographer in the country. In the 50s, the Haywards were the first English-language filmmakers to film in China after the 1949 Communist Revolution. Their film, Inside Red China, includes footage of Ramai presenting a Māori feather cape to Chairman Mao.

The Haywards produced the first colour feature film in New Zealand. To Love a Māori was a controversial film examining race relations. Always their own publicists, Ramai and Rudall travelled New Zealand with the film and in each new town, Ramai would phone every Māori name in the phone book and encourage them to see the film. Despite ill health, Rudall did his part, going out at night to stick up posters advertising the next screening.

A four-minute short film commemorating the filmmakers and their careers has been created in partnership with Ngā Taonga Sound and Vision, Radio New Zealand and TVNZ. The Haywards’ whanau will attend the opening and a private blessing which will be held prior to the official opening.


ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Legendary Bassist David Friesen Plays Wellington’s Newest Jazz Venue

Friesen is touring New Zealand to promote his latest album Another Time, Another Place, recorded live at Auckland's Creative Jazz Club in 2015. More>>

Howard Davis Review: The Father - Descending Into The Depths of Dementia

Florian Zeller's dazzling drama The Father explores the effects of a deeply unsettling illness that affects 62,000 Kiwis, a number expected to grow to 102,000 by 2030. More>>


Howard Davis Review: Blade Runner Redivivus

When Ridley Scott's innovative, neo-noir, sci-fi flick Blade Runner was originally released in 1982, at a cost of over $45 million, it was a commercial bomb. More>>

14-21 October: New Zealand Improv Festival In Wellington

Imagined curses, Shibuya’s traffic, the apocalypse, and motherhood have little in common, but all these and more serve as inspiration for the eclectic improvised offerings coming to BATS Theatre this October for the annual New Zealand Improv Festival. More>>

ALSO:

Bird Of The Year Off To A Flying Start

The competition asks New Zealanders to vote for their favourite bird in the hopes of raising awareness of the threats they face. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books:
Jenny Abrahamson's John & Charles Enys: Castle Hill Runholders, 1864-1891

This volume will be of interest to a range of readers interested in the South Island high country, New Zealand’s natural environment, and the history of science. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION