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Two Days Left to Find Conservation Innovation’s Bold Ideas

Two Days Left to Find Conservation Innovation’s Big, Bold Ideas

There are two days left to enter big, bold ideas and new solutions to New Zealand’s greatest environmental challenges, such as freshwater quality, climate change, species decline and invasive pests.

Open until midnight, Sunday 15 October, WWF-New Zealand’s 2017 Conservation Innovation Awards will reward innovative environmental game-changers. A prize package of $25,000 will be awarded to each of the three winners. To submit an idea, visit wwf-nz.crowdicity.com.

As of today, 36 entries have been logged from Kiwis across the country including from Dunedin, Nelson, Auckland, Raglan, Kerikeri, Hamilton, Martinborough, Wellington, Mangonui, Wanganui, Palmerston North, Christchurch and Waikanae. And more entries are welcome.

“Ingenuity and innovation are characteristics that Kiwis are renowned for, so if you have a bright idea that could make a real difference in the fight to protect our precious ecosystems and native species, get in quick and enter this year’s Conservation Innovation Awards,” said Livia Esterhazy, WWF-New Zealand’s Chief Executive Officer.

“We’re really keen to hear about any ideas, new technologies or innovative projects that tackle conservation obstacles, like climate, weeds, environmental education, invasive pests, improving water quality and saving native species,” she said. “Innovation can solve some of New Zealand's biggest conservation challenges and capitalise on the biggest opportunities – business as usual is no longer an option.”

The Awards are driven by an innovative crowd sourcing application process – where inventors, conservationists and inquiring minds can come together to propose and refine ideas in real time. All New Zealanders can get involved in the Awards by joining the WWF Conservation Innovation community at wwf-nz.crowdicity.com to comment and vote on their favourite ideas.

Prizes will be awarded in three categories: Engaging young people and communities; Predator Free New Zealand 2050; and an Open Category. The 2017 Awards are supported by The Tindall Foundation, Department of Conservation, Callaghan Innovation, Predator Free 2050 and New Zealand’s Biological Heritage National Science Challenge.

An independent judging panel will be looking for new ideas that have practical application and are game-changers for the environment. Now in its fourth year, the winners will be announced at a ceremony in Wellington on 22 November.

For information about the Awards, past winners and how to enter, visit www.wwf.org.nz/innovation

ENDS


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