Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

Love's Illusions

Love's Illusions

Songs of romance, passion, vanity and loss
With guest conductor Shawn Condon

3pm, Sunday 22 April 2018
Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament, Hill Street
Tickets from Eventfinda

Programming a concert is one of those tasks that make conductors cringe but—deep down—they secretly enjoy. Kind of like love?

In this concert, Wellington chamber choir Nota Bene presents songs about the different shapes of love in our lives, how it changes over time, and the agony, passion, obsession, anger and confusion we experience under its spell.

The programme features works from Hugo Alfvén and Jean Sibelius—representing the staid and steadfast—to C. V. Stanford’s Elizabethan Pastorals, exuding the charm and innocence of young love. Works of lesser-known composers like Juha Holma, Mia Makaroff and Jonna Salminen also feature, as well as contemporary choral legends like Eric Whitacre and Morton Lauridsen.

In the latter part of the programme we will sing an arrangement of Ev’ry Time We Say Goodbye and a piece by Japanese composer Toru Takamitsu, typically known for his instrumental compositions, both masterfully written with sumptuous and colourful jazz chords that leave you wanting more. Naturally, you can’t call a programme 'Love’s Illusions' without showing a little love to Joni Mitchell—we have a brilliant transcription of Both Sides Now, as arranged by the Australian vocal ensemble, The Idea of North.

Love's Illusions is directed by Shawn Michael Condon. Shawn maintains an active career as a conductor, teacher, pianist and accompanist. As a choral conductor he was recently appointed to the position of Artistic Director of the Bach Choir of Wellington. In addition to his choral conducting, Shawn is a tutor in the School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing at Massey University and sings bass in Nota Bene.

His current research interests include improving expressivity in choral singing, teaching expressivity, creativity in the choral rehearsal, and health and wellbeing through choral singing.

A New Jersey native, Shawn now calls Wellington home, but most recently hails from Jyväskylä, Finland, where he is finishing his PhD in music education at The University of Jyväskylä. Prior to his arrival in New Zealand, Shawn earned a Master degree in Music, Mind & Technology from the University of Jyväskylä and his Bachelor of Music degree in Choral Music Education and piano from The College of New Jersey, following which he served as the Director of Choral Music for Ramsey Public Schools, in New Jersey.

As Shawn so aptly puts it: “So yes, I was blinded by love in selecting this repertoire and the choir fell in love at first sight (with the music)—we hope you will, too!”

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Joseph Cederwall Review: NZSO Plays Zappa

The first of the NZSO’s Shed Series concerts at the more informal and intimate space of Wellington's Shed 6 last Friday night featured music composed by, or with a connection to Frank Zappa. Zappa, a psychedelic rock legend, activist and popular culture figure and all round colourful character, was an excellent choice for the concert’s theme of innovation. More>>

Let The Games Begin: PM Sends Best Wishes To Athletes

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has sent her warm wishes to the New Zealand athletes preparing for the opening of the Commonwealth Games on Australia’s Gold Coast... More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review of Books: Martin Edmonds' The Expatriates

This book is an extension of, and tribute to, the life’s work of James McNeish. Without sacrificing any degree of authorial independence, the result is gracefully written, handsomely produced, and likely to propagate many further works of its kind. More>>

Max Rashbrooke Review: The King's Singers and Voices New Zealand

To be good at one thing is impressive; to be so versatile across a range of genres is truly exceptional. More>>

Joe Cederwall Review: WOMAD 2018 - Harmony of Difference (part 1)

A friend described WOMAD as his “favourite white middle class celebration of diversity.” There is certainly an echo of truth to this as the crowd is still largely white and middle class, but this WOMAD for me represented that a better world is possible ... More>>

Harmony of Difference (part 2)

Top international world music artists seldom make it down to this neck of the woods, so for those of us into this sort of thing WOMAD is certainly a welcome addition to the cultural calendar. Now it is a case of waiting and looking forward to seeing what they manage to conjure up for next year. More>>

Howard Davis Review: A Bigger Splash - Te Papa Celebrates Twenty Years

Considering the available resources, this is a decidedly hit-and-miss affair, mainly due to some highly questionable curatorial decisions. In their overweening wish to "push boundaries," Charlotte Davy and Megan Tamati-Quennell have made a number of serious miscalculations by ignoring a basic rule - keep it simple. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland