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Rembrandt Remastered exhibition coming to Christchurch

Rembrandt Remastered exhibition coming to the Arts Centre of Christchurch

Visitors to the Arts Centre of Christchurch will have the rare opportunity to get to know one of the greatest artists of all time from 5 September to 3 October, 2018.

Rembrandt Remastered showcases 57 stunning life-size reproductions of Rembrandt’s paintings that have each been digitally remastered to their original condition.

The exhibition will be held in the Arts Centre’s Great Hall and will be open seven days a week.

Using the latest techniques and art expert Professor Ernst van de Wetering’s extensive knowledge of the Dutch master, the exhibition works have been digitally restored to look exactly as they did when left Rembrandt’s studio nearly 400 years ago.

Curated by Australasia’s foremost Rembrandt specialist, Dr Erin Griffey, the head of art history at the University of Auckland, the works – which include The Nightwatch, The Anatomy Lesson and The Jewish Bride – are presented in their original size and displayed in chronological order with accompanying text telling the story of the works, as well as stories from the painter’s life.

“The contemporary technology behind this exhibition allows us wonderful insight into the life and work of the great 17th century Dutch master,” says Arts Centre chief executive Philip Aldridge.

“The works alone are remarkable – we are able to see them as fresh as the day Rembrandt made his final strokes. Viewing them in the beautifully restored Great Hall makes it extra special.”

Rembrandt’s original works are scattered around the globe including several in private collections – some are damaged, some lost and some modified. Rembrandt Remastered gives Great Hall visitors the rare opportunity to see many of his works together in one stunning space.

Exhibition dates: Wednesday 5 September to Wednesday 3 October 2018.

Admission: Adults $10, children aged under 18 $5, limited accessibility pass $5 (part of the exhibition is on the stage, accessible only via stairs).

Opening hours: 10am to 5pm, seven days a week. On Fridays the exhibition will be open until 9:00pm with refreshments available to purchase after 5pm.

Tickets: These can be purchased on entry at the Great Hall or online at artscentre.org.nz/events/rembrandt-remastered.

The Great Hall is available to hire for evening events during the exhibition, providing a unique venue for corporate events, launches and other special occasions.

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