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Teacher Represents City's Helping Hand

Christchurch City Council


The presence in Christchurch of Carlos Maduela, a 21-year-old teacher from Mozambique, represents a long-term effort by the City Council to help one of the poorest countries of the world.

Carlos arrived in Christchurch in April to begin English studies for six months. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade has funded his flight and tuition fees, and the Christchurch College of English (where he is studying) has given Carlos a scholarship for his home staying. The Lions Club of Christchurch has helped fund his daily out-of-pocket expenses. The project is co-ordinated by the City Council but is funded from non-ratepayer sources. He is from Inhambane and he is staying with a Christchurch family. The concept was first raised in 1993 when a proposal was put to the Council that it made a link with a least developed country. It was adopted in principle in 1994 and the then Mayor, Vicki Buck and Councillor David Close visited Mozambique 1997 to assess the feasibility of Christchurch establishing a link with Inhambane. It was decided that communications were always going to be difficult in forging any link. So it was decided to bring a resident of Inhambane to Christchurch as "a practical means of support for the link." Carlos, a teacher at the 29 Septembre High School in Inhambane, was chosen and he arrived in April. He will speak to schools and groups in Christchurch during his stay here. His progress in improving his English, and in particular, the speed with which he is picking up computer skills has been impressive, says the City Council's International Relations Co-ordinator, Dave Adamson.

Further information: Dave Adamson: 371 1775.


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