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Online learning has exciting future

Computer-based learning materials held by Australian universities could be marketed internationally the Australian Minister for Education, Training and Youth Affairs, Dr David Kemp said today.

Announcing the results of a new report on computer-based learning materials being developed by Australian universities, Dr Kemp urged institutions to investigate better ways of sharing information.

"Australian universities are developing world-class computer based learning materials and we need to encourage the sharing of these learning resources across institutions and to develop systems that could also be sold onto the global market.

"Given the large investment by universities into the creation of computer based learning materials, the development of a national data base is certainly worthwhile," said Dr Kemp.

The study, *Developing A Framework For A Useable And Useful Inventory Of Computer-Facilitated Learning And Support Materials In Australian Universities*, recommends cataloguing the computer based learning materials to help teachers and lecturers identify useful resources.

"I encourage universities to read the report and to investigate how a national inventory may be developed. The benefits will not only help Australian universities but may also assist the marketing of Australia’s computer based learning materials internationally," said Dr Kemp.

Copies of the report are available at www.detya.gov.au

See also www.australia.org.nz

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