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Internal Assessment Behind Medal Table Decline

Internal Assessment Behind Medal Table Decline

"Internal assessment and refusing to pay expenses for sports coaches has led to a decline in sports in secondary schools that is now showing up in medals tables," said Concerned Teachers spokesperson Peter Calvert. "Both events began in the 1980s and have virtually wiped out top level sport in around 250 (out of 350) of New Zealand's secondary schools."

"Putting $16m into elite sport - as Trevor Mallard is talking about - will not broaden the base which is required in secondary schools, long regarded as the cradle of top sports," Mr Calvert said.

"Our secondary teachers and schools used to be the 'high performance sports centres' and they were in every community in the country in the days of Snell, Halberg and Walker (1960s and 1970s)."

"Since the 1980s and the removal of University Entrance, the whole sixth form year is internally assessed. But many subjects for School C and Bursary now have an internally assessed component of 20 to 50%. This has meant teachers have had to give up or reduce the effort they put into sports coaching, since no extra time was provided for schools by the Government. Teachers refer to this as 'eternal assessment' today."

"It is hardly surprising that many boys' schools are opposed to the spread of internal assessment with the NCEA. They have fought to retain sports and are the sole remaining guardian of our sports heritage," said Mr Calvert. "Trevor Mallard as Minister of both Education and Sport should kill the NCEA and reduce internal assessment as well as reintroduce a system of reimbursement for miles travelled by teacher coaches for sport."

Ends

For more information: Peter Calvert (021) 2111 825

ConcernedTeachers@xtra.co.nz

www.concernedteachers.com


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