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TEAC delivers nightmare scenario for students

TEAC delivers nightmare
scenario for students

The New Zealand University Students’ Association is condemning the TEAC report on funding and its unprecedented attack on students, both in terms of student support and access to tertiary education.

The report contains recommendations to remove the current policy of no interest on student loans while studying, severely limit access to allowances, introduce extensive capping of student numbers, and continue to allow institutions to set unlimited fees.

“Students are appalled by TEAC’s recommendations. This is a major step backwards for our tertiary education system and the report should be immediately rejected by government,” said NZUSA Co-President Andrew Campbell.

“At the last election voters clearly signalled they wanted tertiary costs to come down. TEAC has ignored that and has set out a vision of education for an elite few. Learners are not central to this vision, except as cash cows for institutions,” said Campbell.

“The whole TEAC process has been an abject failure. TEAC has done nothing to protect public education or improve outcomes for learners, instead they have chosen to get into bed with the PTEs and source extra money off students,” said Andrew Campbell. “This report is as disappointing as last week’s Select Committee report on fees, loans and allowances.”

NZUSA will be calling on the government to set out an urgent plan to improve access and quality in tertiary education, and to back up this plan with increased resources.

“Students have no faith in TEAC and their mindless attacks on students without a shred of evidence to support them. The Government has a lot to do to restore confidence in their work and their ability to deliver in tertiary education,” said Campbell.

ENDS

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