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Education 14 Win Export Commendation

20 November 2001

Media Release

Education 14 Win Export Commendation For India Success

An export network of 14 New Zealand education institutions which joined forces to develop the challenging Indian market has been awarded a Trade New Zealand Export Commendation for its effectiveness.

India Education Export Network (IEEN) Chairperson Tricia Reade (Manukau Institute of Technology) says in the eight months to February 2001, the network increased the number of Indian students travelling to New Zealand to study to 483, up from 193 students in the same period the previous year. Those 483 students generated $6.28 million in foreign exchange in fees and a further $4.83 million in indirect spending on such things as accommodation, transport and food.

IEEN estimates the number of visas issued to Indian students in 2001 will increase to more than 1000, generating about $25 million in foreign exchange.

Ms Reade says IEEN formed in March 1998 when a group of tertiary institutions interested in India agreed to develop a coordinated and strategic approach to penetrating the India market, working with Trade New Zealand, Education New Zealand and the New Zealand Immigration Service which is responsible for issuing visas to international students.

She says network members have increased from 10 at its inception to an expected 20 by the end of this year. New market entrants are attracted to the network because the risks of developing the difficult Indian education market are identified and shared.

Members include universities, institutes of technology, polytechnics and private training organisations from Auckland in the north to Dunedin in the south. Network activities include a coordinated marketing campaign, the appointment of education consultants in key Indian cities, and participation in education fairs to raise awareness of New Zealand as an education destination.

Trade New Zealand Sector Team Manager Barbara Kohler says the cooperative activities of the network produce significant economies of scale and the ‘New Zealand Inc’ approach creates a united brand image.

“The network approach enables the members to have a regular market presence and a higher profile than they could achieve individually. The network has also developed very strong relationships with key allies, including the New Zealand Immigration Service and Tourism New Zealand, and they are leveraging off these relationships to maximise their impact in India,” says Ms Kohler.

“Collectively, the network members can offer Indian students a diverse range of educational programmes across a broad range of subjects in locations throughout the country.”

Tricia Reade says prior to the formation of IEEN only a few individual
New Zealand education institutions had marketed to India and only on an ad hoc basis.

“New Zealand institutions are competing in India against proactive, well-funded competitors who are already established in the market, including the UK, USA and Australia. However, we do have several competitive advantages which are helping capture a growing share of the market.


“These include the overall education package – fees, living costs – at an affordable cost compared with the UK and the USA. A reputation of being a friendly and inclusive society is a big attraction to international students and we are also perceived as being relatively safe.

“India and New Zealand have similar education systems stemming from common British colonial backgrounds. New Zealand is also an attractive education destination because Indian graduates are given the opportunity of applying for permanent residence or working for two years in the country.”

Ms Reade says all IEEN members are well established and experienced in other international markets. India is a priority emerging market for all the members.

“Currently there are insufficient quality education institutions in India to meet tertiary demand. Indian society holds education in high regards. If students fail to secure places in prestigious Indian tertiary institutions, their preference is to study overseas. English speaking countries are top priority.

“The Indian market is attractive because the students enroll in long term study programmes which maximises the value from money invested in marketing. Graduates also become enthusiastic ambassadors who promote New Zealand education to their compatriots.

“Developing the Indian market is also a good opportunity to diversify and reduce the education sector’s dependency on ASEAN markets.”

The Minister for Trade Negotiations, the Honourable Jim Sutton, presented the award today in Auckland. Mr Sutton said he had seen the excellent work of the network at first hand when he opened the first-ever New Zealand education fairs in India a year ago.

(Media are invited to attend the presentation of the IEEN Trade New Zealand Export Commendation by the Minister for Trade Negotiations, the Honourable Jim Sutton, on Tuesday 20 November 2001, at 2.15pm, in the Trade New Zealand Boardroom, Level 11, The ANZ Centre, 23-29 Albert Street, Auckland)

India Education Export Network Members (awarded the Export Commendation)

AIS St Helens
Auckland University of Technology
Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology
Eastern Institute of Technology
Manukau Institute of Technology
Massey University
Otago Polytechnic
Pacific International Hotel Management School
The University of Auckland
The University of Waikato
UNITEC Institute of Technology
University of Otago
Victoria University of Wellington
Wanganui Regional Community Polytechnic


New IEEN Members
Aspect ILA and Design & Arts College of New Zealand
Senior College/The Academic Colleges Group
Waikato Institute of Technology
Wellington Institute of Technology
Whitireia Community Polytechnic


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