Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 

Maharey Channels Loan Money To Student Politicians

Despite Steve Maharey's so-called clampdown, student loans are still being used to provide millions of dollars to fund non-academic political student associations and pay the wages of activists and fulltime student politicians, Student Choice spokesman Clint Heine said today.

"Last month Steve Maharey said compulsory fees should only contain costs without which students would be unable to complete the mandatory academic requirements of the course. Membership of a political group has nothing to do with completing an academic course, but Maharey is saying that student association fees are as important as tuition fees," Mr Heine said.

"Student associations do not provide academic services. They are political incorporated societies with legal identities entirely separate from tertiary institutions. Why should millions of dollars of taxpayer money be used to deliver income to these groups?" Mr Heine asked.

"Maharey is happy for loans to pay student association fees for a purely political reason. He knows that most student associations give political support to Labour, the Alliance and the Greens. This is simply another case of the government doing favours for their mates," Mr Heine said.

"If some private tertiary providers are to be put under scrutiny over loans, then questions should also be asked about why the loan scheme is being used as a slush fund for student politicians," Mr Heine said.

"This issue also highlights the bigger question of why students are denied the right to freedom of association by being forced to join a political organisation before they can enroll in a tertiary institution," Mr Heine said.

Ends


For more information contact:

Clint Heine
Spokesman Student Choice
021 122 8544
clint@politician.com


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Gordon Campbell: Best New Music Of 2017

Any ‘best of list’ has to be an exercise in wishful thinking, given the splintering of everyone’s listening habits... But maybe… it could be time for the re-discovery of the lost art of listening to an entire album, all the way through. Just putting that idea out there. More>>

Scoop Review of Books: Ten x Ten - One Hundred of Te Papa's Best-Loved Art Works

An idiosyncratic selection by ten art curators, each of whom have chosen ten of their favourite works. Handsomely illustrated, their choices are accompanied by full-page colour prints and brief descriptions of the work, explaining in straightforward and approachable language why it is of historical, cultural, or personal significance. More>>

Scoop Review of Books: Portacom City - Reporting On Canterbury Earthquakes

In Portacom City Paul Gorman describes his own deeply personal story of working as a journalist during the quakes, while also speaking more broadly about the challenges that confront reporters at times of crisis. More>>

Scoop Review of Books: Christopher Pugsley’s The Camera in the Crowd - Filming in New Zealand Peace and War 1895-1920

Pugsley brings to life 25 exhilarating years of film making and picture screening in a sumptuously illustrated hardback published by Oratia that tells the story through surviving footage unearthed from the national film archives. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland