Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 

Computer Graphic Design Degree A First

May 17, 2002

Dual Approach To Computer Graphic Design Degree A First For New Zealand

Waikato University's School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences is offering a Bachelor of Computer Graphic Design (BCGD) in partnership with the Wanganui School of Design, a school within the Universal College of Learning.

The university has traditionally validated graduates' qualifications from the Wanganui facility, but until now has not offered the degree to its own students. BCGD graduates will have their degree jointly awarded by both institutions.

Applications are invited now for the first semester of the three-year course commencing at Waikato in mid-July.

Chairperson of the university's Computer Science Department, Mark Apperley, says the introduction of the computer graphic design course is a significant development for Waikato.

"It represents Waikato's first venture into the art and design area, building on the strengths in traditional computer science and capitalising on the reputation of the Wanganui Computer Graphic Design Degree," says Apperley.

"In this sense, it brings a new culture to the university and will attract new students as well as appealing to many of our existing students.

"Not only does it enhance the spectrum of computing-related qualifications available at Waikato, but it opens up an entirely new domain of creative design."

"The new degree provides a creative computer-based qualification of international standing and opens up new opportunities for students and for industry in the Waikato region."

Senior lecturer Ian Gwilt, who helped develop the computer graphic design programme at Wanganui, says the partnership approach to the degree is a first for New Zealand.

"This is the first time a university and a polytechnic have co-operated like this to jointly award an existing degree," he says. "It's also the only computer graphic design programme provided by a university."

He says the new development provides a unique combination of design and technological curriculum that is not currently available in other degree programmes.

Gwilt describes computer graphic design as a creative process that combines art and technology to communicate ideas. He says the BCGD programme will focus on the technology of design.

"Graduates can expect to find work in a variety of exciting areas including advertising and design, printing and publishing, television and visual communications, digital graphic effects and web design."

First-year students will be given a firm foundation in the basic principles and elements of design. Second-year students will investigate and research in greater depth information from year one. Modules offered include an introduction to time-based media which covers advanced 3D modelling, animation, image-making, interactive media and video.

Third-year students will undertake an intern project where design research, theory, creativity, technical and communication skills are applied to practical projects for selected non-profit clients.

Students have the option of a fourth year for a specialised research-based honours degree. This requires students to prepare a postgraduate thesis and develop a body of work based on this research. The programme encourages students to use their talents and creativity to push beyond traditional design boundaries.

Programmes are also in place for postgraduate diplomas and Master of Computer Graphic Design.

The school's public relations and marketing co-ordinator, Nicola Boland, says entry to the BCGD will be limited to 25 students each semester so students are advised to get their applications in quickly. Selection interview dates are set for June 7 and 10, and the course begins on July 15.

END

News Release May 17, 2002

Dual Approach To Computer Graphic Design Degree A First For New Zealand

Waikato University's School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences is offering a Bachelor of Computer Graphic Design (BCGD) in partnership with the Wanganui School of Design, a school within the Universal College of Learning.

The university has traditionally validated graduates' qualifications from the Wanganui facility, but until now has not offered the degree to its own students. BCGD graduates will have their degree jointly awarded by both institutions.

Applications are invited now for the first semester of the three-year course commencing at Waikato in mid-July.

Chairperson of the university's Computer Science Department, Mark Apperley, says the introduction of the computer graphic design course is a significant development for Waikato.

"It represents Waikato's first venture into the art and design area, building on the strengths in traditional computer science and capitalising on the reputation of the Wanganui Computer Graphic Design Degree," says Apperley.

"In this sense, it brings a new culture to the university and will attract new students as well as appealing to many of our existing students.

"Not only does it enhance the spectrum of computing-related qualifications available at Waikato, but it opens up an entirely new domain of creative design."

"The new degree provides a creative computer-based qualification of international standing and opens up new opportunities for students and for industry in the Waikato region."

Senior lecturer Ian Gwilt, who helped develop the computer graphic design programme at Wanganui, says the partnership approach to the degree is a first for New Zealand.

"This is the first time a university and a polytechnic have co-operated like this to jointly award an existing degree," he says. "It's also the only computer graphic design programme provided by a university."

He says the new development provides a unique combination of design and technological curriculum that is not currently available in other degree programmes.

Gwilt describes computer graphic design as a creative process that combines art and technology to communicate ideas. He says the BCGD programme will focus on the technology of design.

"Graduates can expect to find work in a variety of exciting areas including advertising and design, printing and publishing, television and visual communications, digital graphic effects and web design."

First-year students will be given a firm foundation in the basic principles and elements of design. Second-year students will investigate and research in greater depth information from year one. Modules offered include an introduction to time-based media which covers advanced 3D modelling, animation, image-making, interactive media and video.

Third-year students will undertake an intern project where design research, theory, creativity, technical and communication skills are applied to practical projects for selected non-profit clients.

Students have the option of a fourth year for a specialised research-based honours degree. This requires students to prepare a postgraduate thesis and develop a body of work based on this research. The programme encourages students to use their talents and creativity to push beyond traditional design boundaries.

Programmes are also in place for postgraduate diplomas and Master of Computer Graphic Design.

The school's public relations and marketing co-ordinator, Nicola Boland, says entry to the BCGD will be limited to 25 students each semester so students are advised to get their applications in quickly. Selection interview dates are set for June 7 and 10, and the course begins on July 15.

END

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
At Bats: Locke - The World Theatrical Premiere

On the eve of the biggest challenge of his career, Ivan Locke receives a phone call that sets in motion a series of events that will unravel his family, job and soul... More>>

Howard Davis Review: Conflict & Resistance - Ria Hall's Rules of Engagement

From the aftermath of war through colonisation to her own personal convictions, Hall's new CD addresses current issues and social problems on multiple levels, confirming her position as a polemical and preeminent voice on the indigenous NZ music scene. More>>

Howard Davis Review: Another Time, Another Place - David Friesen Trio Live

"It has been said of David Friesen that he does for the art of bass playing what Pythagoras did for the triangle" - Patrick Hinley, Jazz Times. More>>


Howard Davis Review: Blade Runner Redivivus

When Ridley Scott's innovative, neo-noir, sci-fi flick Blade Runner was originally released in 1982, at a cost of over $45 million, it was a commercial bomb. More>>

Howard Davis Review: The Father - Descending Into The Depths of Dementia

Florian Zeller's dazzling drama The Father explores the effects of a deeply unsettling illness that affects 62,000 Kiwis, a number expected to grow to 102,000 by 2030. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books:
Jenny Abrahamson's John & Charles Enys: Castle Hill Runholders, 1864-1891

This volume will be of interest to a range of readers interested in the South Island high country, New Zealand’s natural environment, and the history of science. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION