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Emerging law and economic talent rewarded

Emerging law and economic talent rewarded

The combination of legal analysis and economic alacrity will be rewarded tomorrow evening in a presentation of prize-winning essays by third year law and economics students.

This inaugural event, run by Victoria’s School of Law and School of Economics and Finance, recognises up-and-coming students in the relatively new discipline of joint law and economics study.

One of four student finalists will receive a $500 first prize in the Students on Show event, sponsored by the New Zealand Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation, based at Victoria University.

Senior Lecturer Judy Kavanagh, School of Economics and Finance, says the winner will be announced at the prize giving ceremony on Thursday, 10 July.

“The essay topics illustrate the wide range of issues that are susceptible to law and economics analysis,” says Ms Kavanagh.

“Each student has shown an impressive depth of understanding of the law and economics approach in their work.”

“This event provides industry leaders and the legal fraternity with a wonderful opportunity to see what these students can do,” she says.

The class of 65 students were given three essay topics to choose from, or could propose their own in consultation with their lecturer. A long list of 10 essays was selected and reduced down to four.

The four students and their essay topics (abstracts attached) are: Simon Brett (own topic) – ACC: An Efficient Solution to Tort Liability? David Carter (own topic) – Unbundling the Local Loop: Consumer Welfare Effects. Jason Nichols (own topic) – Could Government Intervention Solve the Power Crisis? Richard Robinson (assigned topic) – Vertical Restraints and their Effect on Competition.

Mark Berry, barrister and former Commerce Commission Deputy Chair will officiate at the prize-giving. Sir Ivor Richardson – a Distinguished Fellow at the School of Law – will present the prizes. Industry leaders from Wellington business and legal professions have been invited to attend.

Work done by New Zealand Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation feeds into course work of the third-year Law and Economics paper.

Prizes will be awarded on Thursday, 10 July between 6 - 6.45pm in Lecture Theatre 3, School of Law, Government Buildings, Lambton Quay.

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