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Sharing Education Knowledge

Media Release
Stephen Ward
media relations manager

Sharing Education Knowledge

Waikato University staff and other New Zealand educators will have the opportunity to hear about education issues in the Pacific nations at an international gathering of adult education specialists next week.

The executive of the Asian South Pacific Bureau of Adult Education (ASPBAE) is holding its annual meeting in Hamilton, hosted by the university’s School of Mâori and Pacific Development (SMPD) and a community group called Impaect* (Indigenous, Maori and Pacific Adult Education Charitable Trust). ASPBAE’s fundamental mission is to promote the rights of adults to learn and to have equitable access to education.

The ASPBAE executive council and staff comprise people drawn from civil society organizations: non-government organisations and universities who are experts in their particular countries in terms of promoting education, especially adult education. There will be representatives from: India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Japan, Hong Kong, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, PNG, Vanuatu, Australia and Samoa. The Honorable Marian Hobbs will also attend as well as representatives from Oxfam NZ and NZ Aid who collaborate with Aspbae on specific projects in the Pacific nations.

SMPD pou tikanga (chair of tikanga) Sandy Morrison says: “Some of the successes and issues that arise here for Pacific people may be applicable to education back in the Pacific nations. Also, the New Zealand education system takes account of Mâori, pakeha and Pacific cultures and our experiences may be useful to people in other countries particularly in terms of cultural co-existence.”

ENDS

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