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Teachers acknowledged around the world

4 October 2004

Media Release

Teachers acknowledged around the world

World Teachers’ Day tomorrow is being acknowledged by the University of Auckland’s Faculty of Education with the launch of a video that celebrates literacy in young children.

The theme of World Teachers’ Day this year is ‘Qualified Teachers to be recruited and trained’. Instigated by UNESCO in 1994, the day is an annual reminder of the global goal of ‘education for all’ by 2015. Ten years on, the day is commemorated in over 100 countries.

Dean of the Faculty of Education, Dr John Langley, will launch the Faculty of Education’s video entitled ‘Excuse me! We’re reading and writing’, aimed at people studying to become early childhood teachers as well as those already working in centres. It highlights current literacy theory and practice that support young children to become successful readers and writers.

“Sound teaching practices in early childhood lay the foundations for all subsequent learning. Literacy is the cornerstone of that learning. It’s highly appropriate to celebrate World Teachers’ Day by acknowledging and supporting the teachers who are moulding the minds and attitudes to learning of our youngest citizens,” said Dr Langley.

“The video shows that the functions of literacy, the power of literacy and the dispositions towards reading, writing and recording can be successfully modelled and talked about. The many examples of wise practice are an exceptionally rich resource to guide adults and children in their everyday activities in centres.”

A quantum leap was occurring in early childhood education in New Zealand as the Government focused on producing qualified teachers for the sector. It was a good reason for celebrating the day and a positive reminder of New Zealand’s progress in international terms, he said.

The launch event will also honour the 2004 recipients of ‘excellence in teaching awards’ recognising outstanding teachers at all levels, including two early childhood educators, the first from that sector to receive the national award.

‘Excuse me! We’re reading and writing’ was conceived and produced by video producer Judy Duncan and languages lecturer Nola Harvey at the Faculty of Education, in collaboration with teachers, children and families at several early childhood services in Auckland.

The video is available from Kohia Teachers Centre, Epsom, Auckland, for $39.95.


ENDS

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