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World recognised financial risk exam coming to NZ

World recognised financial risk exam coming to NZ

Students and professional financial risk managers can now take the Financial Risk Manager (FRM) certification exam in New Zealand.

The world recognised FRM exam will be held at AUT on Saturday, 19 November 2005. Previously, it could only be taken overseas.

The exam will follow close on the heels of the inaugural meeting of the New Zealand chapter of Global Association of Risk Professionals (GARP), scheduled for October.

GARP is the world’s leading organisation for risk managers. The New Zealand chapter is headed by two AUT Business Faculty academics, recently appointed co-regional directors.

Professor Alireza Tourani-Rad and Associate Professor Ming-Hua Liu were appointed to represent New Zealand by the 46,000-member association.

Alongside the New Zealand chapter of GARP for professionals, they are establishing a college chapter for university students, based at AUT.

“We hope to promote best practices and provide a forum where risk managers and researchers from the financial industry, corporate sector, government and academic institutions can interact with each other,” Alireza and Ming-Hua said.

“We also hope to provide networking opportunities for students, to cultivate their interest in the risk field, provide research opportunities and a test location for all those seeking FRM certification.”

GARP is a non-profit independent association of risk management practitioners and researchers representing banks, investment management firms, government regulatory bodies, academic institutions, corporations and other financial organisations.

ENDS

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