Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 

Educational Leader Overcomes Odds

Educational Leader Overcomes Odds

From survivor Vanuatu to survivor Waikato - Johnny Marango surely wins the prize for overcoming adversity. The University of Waikato School of Education graduate is from Lelepa (Efate) the same island that the television show, “Survivor Vanuatu” was filmed on.

Lelepa has a population of 300 and the main mode of transport is canoe. Lelepa is on the western side of Efate, the main island near Port Vila. The island which is situated at the entrance of the Havannah harbour is a World War Two memorial site and has a paramount chief and a council consisting of low ranking chiefs.

Johnny says in Vanuatu gaining an education beyond secondary school is rare and gaining a postgraduate qualification is even rarer. However, Johnny is an exception. He arrived in New Zealand in March 2004 after receiving a New Zealand Government Assistance Aid Development scholarship. Back home he was a secondary school teacher, a Ministry of Education research officer and then the acting director for non-formal education for the Ministry of Youth Development and Training.

Now with a Postgraduate Diploma in Educational Leadership from the School of Education, Johnny wants to utilise his new skills and also complete his Masters in Educational Leadership.

“In Vanuatu there are not many graduates who work in educational administration. We need the resource people to help improve our education system. What is important is developing our skills and knowledge because the world and technology is changing.”

Johnny admits uprooting his family, settling in a new country and studying is a challenge. However he is grateful for the support he received from School of Education staff, in particular lecturer Jane Strachan. Jane was instrumental in developing Vanuatu’s gender education policy and met Johnny in Vanuatu. She encouraged him to pursue higher education and then mentored him when he began his studies.

“I really appreciated the support I had from the university’s support services and lecturers. I had good times and bad times, but the university staff were very kind and gave me direction. Sometimes I wanted to give up but they encouraged me not to.”

Johnny says studying has developed him personally but has also given him a better understanding of educational leadership and the relevant issues. In particular he is keen to educate parents about the value of education. He hopes to do this through workshops.

“The most important thing that I have learned is the need to develop partnerships with the government, schools and communities. No man’s an island. We need to work together more closely and raise our standard of education. Parents need to be more involved in their children’s education.”

Eager to make a difference in Vanuatu, Johnny believes education is the key. He encourages other teachers from the Pacific islands to apply for scholarships and to also utilise the School of Education’s online facilities.

“Education is one of the key priorities for development not only for children but for the nation as a whole. It helps provide employment and benefits the country economically.”

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Legendary Bassist David Friesen Plays Wellington’s Newest Jazz Venue

Friesen is touring New Zealand to promote his latest album Another Time, Another Place, recorded live at Auckland's Creative Jazz Club in 2015. More>>

Howard Davis Review: The Father - Descending Into The Depths of Dementia

Florian Zeller's dazzling drama The Father explores the effects of a deeply unsettling illness that affects 62,000 Kiwis, a number expected to grow to 102,000 by 2030. More>>


Howard Davis Review: Blade Runner Redivivus

When Ridley Scott's innovative, neo-noir, sci-fi flick Blade Runner was originally released in 1982, at a cost of over $45 million, it was a commercial bomb. More>>

14-21 October: New Zealand Improv Festival In Wellington

Imagined curses, Shibuya’s traffic, the apocalypse, and motherhood have little in common, but all these and more serve as inspiration for the eclectic improvised offerings coming to BATS Theatre this October for the annual New Zealand Improv Festival. More>>

ALSO:

Bird Of The Year Off To A Flying Start

The competition asks New Zealanders to vote for their favourite bird in the hopes of raising awareness of the threats they face. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books:
Jenny Abrahamson's John & Charles Enys: Castle Hill Runholders, 1864-1891

This volume will be of interest to a range of readers interested in the South Island high country, New Zealand’s natural environment, and the history of science. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION