Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 

NZ Dictionary Of Favourite Words

NZ Dictionary Of Favourite Words

Bash ... bikkies...biff ... chook ... compere ... dak ... doozie ... Hori ... lippy ... mates’ rates ... OE ... perve ... pottle ... Rotovegas ... sheila ... skint ... throw a wobbly ... waka jumper ... yakking ... zorb...

What does it all mean?!

Visitors to New Zealand are frequently puzzled by words and phrases in our language that we take for granted. Not only do we have our own accent, but we also have a rich vocabulary that is distinctive and individual.

In The Godzone Dictionary of favourite New Zealand words and phrases (to be published on 3 July 2006), language expert Max Cryer examines a wide range of words and phrases – from Aotearoa and Avondale spiders to Zambuck and Zespri – shedding light on their origins and offering helpful definitions. This new dictionary is a concise A – Z of the words and phrases that make our New Zealand language and speech patterns distinctive.

Slang words and expressions feature heavily, and one of the unique features of this book is the large number of Maori words that have become part of our common language in recent years. The listing also includes the popular names of our sports teams and an appendix of common New Zealand acronyms completes the book.

The Godzone Dictionary highlights the development of some strong local speech idiosyncrasies. “Strangely prevalent,” mentions Cryer, “is the New Zealand liking for hypocorism or retaining baby-talk into adulthood.” Examples include words such as drinkies, pickies, ta-ta, barbie, rellies, Chrissy and many others.

The Godzone Dictionary comprises words and terms whose usage is in general confined within New Zealand. Some were created here, others may have originated, and been forgotten, elsewhere, but they remain in currency here. From Rotovegas to the Naki, both Kiwis (or should that be Pig Islanders?) and visitors to our shores will find the lingo of Godzone explained simply and accurately. Sweet as!


MAX CRYER has for many years been one of New Zealand’s most prominent entertainers and broadcasters. Well-known as a singer, compere, television presenter and quizmaster, over the last ten years he has gained further celebrity through his popular ‘Curious Questions’ language programmes on radio. He has written several books, including the definitive history of our national anthems, Hear Our Voices, We Entreat. A former teacher, Max is now a full-time writer living in Auckland.


THE GODZONE DICTIONARY
of favourite New Zealand words and phrases

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Reuben Moss' Property is Theft! & Kaitani at The Physics Room

Property is Theft! continues Moss’ interest in the contemporary urban environment as a space controlled by pulsing and unequal flows of capital and labour. Kaitani features work by the University of Canterbury Fijian Students Association and Kulimoe’anga Stone Maka. More>>


Handcrafted Form: Rare Treasures From Japan

This unique exhibition at Expressions Whirinaki represents 90 everyday objects made by contemporary Japanese artisans who employ various traditional craft techniques made in regional workshops. The works used in daily life are crafted from raw materials with techniques appropriate to bringing out the best of its medium, balancing ease of use with aesthetic appeal. More>>

Howard Davis Article: A Musical Axis - Brahms, Wagner, Sibelius

Brahms' warm and exquisitely subtle Symphony No. 3 in F major, Wagner's irrepressibly sentimental symphonic poem Siegfried Idyll, and Sibelius' chilling and immensely challenging Violin Concerto in D minor exemplify distinct stages of development in a tangled and convoluted series of skirmishes that came to define subsequent disputes about the nature of post-Romantic orchestral writing well into the following century. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: A Pale Ghost Writer

Reviewed by Ruth Brassington, Richard Flanagan's new novel is about a novelist hastily ghost-writing the biography of a crook about to go to trial. The reader is kept on a cliff-edge, as the narrator tries to get blood out of his stone man. More>>

New Zealand Wars Commemoration: Witi Ihimaera's Sleeps Standing Moetū

The second of several articles to mark Rā Maumahara, remembering the New Zealand Land Wars. The first was a Q&A with Vincent O’Malley, author of The Great War for New Zealand: Waikato 1800–2000. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland