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NZ Dictionary Of Favourite Words

NZ Dictionary Of Favourite Words

Bash ... bikkies...biff ... chook ... compere ... dak ... doozie ... Hori ... lippy ... mates’ rates ... OE ... perve ... pottle ... Rotovegas ... sheila ... skint ... throw a wobbly ... waka jumper ... yakking ... zorb...

What does it all mean?!

Visitors to New Zealand are frequently puzzled by words and phrases in our language that we take for granted. Not only do we have our own accent, but we also have a rich vocabulary that is distinctive and individual.

In The Godzone Dictionary of favourite New Zealand words and phrases (to be published on 3 July 2006), language expert Max Cryer examines a wide range of words and phrases – from Aotearoa and Avondale spiders to Zambuck and Zespri – shedding light on their origins and offering helpful definitions. This new dictionary is a concise A – Z of the words and phrases that make our New Zealand language and speech patterns distinctive.

Slang words and expressions feature heavily, and one of the unique features of this book is the large number of Maori words that have become part of our common language in recent years. The listing also includes the popular names of our sports teams and an appendix of common New Zealand acronyms completes the book.

The Godzone Dictionary highlights the development of some strong local speech idiosyncrasies. “Strangely prevalent,” mentions Cryer, “is the New Zealand liking for hypocorism or retaining baby-talk into adulthood.” Examples include words such as drinkies, pickies, ta-ta, barbie, rellies, Chrissy and many others.

The Godzone Dictionary comprises words and terms whose usage is in general confined within New Zealand. Some were created here, others may have originated, and been forgotten, elsewhere, but they remain in currency here. From Rotovegas to the Naki, both Kiwis (or should that be Pig Islanders?) and visitors to our shores will find the lingo of Godzone explained simply and accurately. Sweet as!


MAX CRYER has for many years been one of New Zealand’s most prominent entertainers and broadcasters. Well-known as a singer, compere, television presenter and quizmaster, over the last ten years he has gained further celebrity through his popular ‘Curious Questions’ language programmes on radio. He has written several books, including the definitive history of our national anthems, Hear Our Voices, We Entreat. A former teacher, Max is now a full-time writer living in Auckland.


THE GODZONE DICTIONARY
of favourite New Zealand words and phrases

Ends

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