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AUT design students benefit from new Apple deal

AUT design students benefit from new Apple deal

AUT University art and design students are among the university's Mac users who will benefit from a new Apple computer deal.

A supply agreement signed with Renaissance Ltd's Apple Computer Division means students will get the latest Mac computers and instant IT support.

The group will provide Apple hardware, imaging, installation and on-site servicing as well as training and advice on future planning.

There are more than 500 Apple computers on AUT campuses. Most are used in the schools of Art and Design and Communication Studies, and the Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences.

Renaissance provides AUT staff with technical training. It also recently contributed iPods for use on Te Ara Poutama's te reo Maori iPod trial and supported AUT senior lecturer Peter Mellow's nationwide mobile phone learning tool 'studytxt'.

The agreement means Renaissance and AUT will seek more partnership opportunities, particularly in academic advancement and research.

AUT's IT Services Director Liz Gosling says the university is committed to providing students with the latest technologies to best prepare them for their professional lives.

"We are focussed on ensuring the technologies used at AUT are of the highest quality. Our partnership with Renaissance provides for the best level of equipment, support and training for our staff and students," she says.

Apple Computer Division's national education manager Graham Prentice says AUT's commitment to supporting their Mac users is second to none.

"We are excited to be a business partner with such a forward looking institution," he says. "AUT is as concerned in looking after their academic staff needs as they are with the economics of staying at the forefront."

"AUT are institutional leaders in building external partnerships. We are pleased to be part of its ongoing innovation and commitment to the changing needs of its students and staff."

Apple Computer Division's executive account manager Tim Durrant says working so closely with AUT from supply to support means the possibilities are endless.

"AUT staff are doing amazing things with Macs, design, iPods, advanced video editing, podcasting, flexible learning, portables - you name it. It's great to be directly involved with academics and support staff and to make sure the latest technologies are being used wisely."


For more information about 'studytxt' visit:
http://www.studyTXT.com.

For more information about Te Ara Poutama's te reo Maori iPod trial visit:
http://www.aut.ac.nz/corp/newsrelease/?468

ENDS

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